summaryrefslogtreecommitdiff
path: root/doc
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
authorCedric BAIL <cedric@osg.samsung.com>2016-03-23 12:56:14 -0700
committerCedric BAIL <cedric@osg.samsung.com>2016-03-23 13:24:41 -0700
commitc2a1c49ab2042f559b28e840e54feb8494888e0e (patch)
treec6eb110b7c479499854eede9d0c3ab0a80c9a11a /doc
parent9340855597e7e465435c69b6278650346688da14 (diff)
elementary: move all legacy files to their expected new location.
Diffstat (limited to 'doc')
-rw-r--r--doc/elementary_examples.dox6880
-rw-r--r--doc/elementary_examples_cxx.dox5332
-rw-r--r--doc/elementary_examples_js.dox1022
-rw-r--r--doc/img/actionslider_inheritance_tree.eps1407
-rw-r--r--doc/img/actionslider_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 6698 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/bg_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/bg_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4587 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/box.eps4082
-rw-r--r--doc/img/box.pngbin0 -> 9139 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/box_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/box_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2341 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/bubble_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/bubble_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4550 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/button_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/button_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4595 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/calendar_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/calendar_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 5051 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/check_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/check_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4748 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/clock_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/clock_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4588 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/colorselector_inheritance_tree.eps1484
-rw-r--r--doc/img/colorselector_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 6300 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/conformant.eps1807
-rw-r--r--doc/img/conformant.pngbin0 -> 5037 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/conformant_inheritance_tree.eps1407
-rw-r--r--doc/img/conformant_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 6474 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/container_inheritance_tree.eps706
-rw-r--r--doc/img/container_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2922 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/ctxpopup_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/ctxpopup_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4940 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/datetime_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/datetime_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4920 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/dayselector_inheritance_tree.eps1388
-rw-r--r--doc/img/dayselector_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 6696 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/diskselector_inheritance_tree.eps1496
-rw-r--r--doc/img/diskselector_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4930 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elementary.pngbin0 -> 7313 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm-widget-hierarchy.epsbin0 -> 1430546 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm-widget-hierarchy.pngbin0 -> 30152 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm-widget-tree.eps104208
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm-widget-tree.pngbin0 -> 379955 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm_animator_curve_style.eps5737
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm_animator_curve_style.pngbin0 -> 23523 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm_flip.eps5799
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm_flip.pngbin0 -> 48972 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm_image_orient_set.eps519
-rw-r--r--doc/img/elm_image_orient_set.pngbin0 -> 17072 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/entry_inheritance_tree.eps2764
-rw-r--r--doc/img/entry_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 8143 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/entry_item.eps5301
-rw-r--r--doc/img/entry_item.pngbin0 -> 34016 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/entry_item_scale.eps6581
-rw-r--r--doc/img/entry_item_scale.pngbin0 -> 20460 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/fileselector_button_inheritance_tree.eps2347
-rw-r--r--doc/img/fileselector_button_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 8518 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/fileselector_entry_inheritance_tree.eps1793
-rw-r--r--doc/img/fileselector_entry_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 6864 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/fileselector_inheritance_tree.eps1359
-rw-r--r--doc/img/fileselector_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 5321 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/flip_inheritance_tree.eps970
-rw-r--r--doc/img/flip_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 3708 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/flipselector_inheritance_tree.eps1359
-rw-r--r--doc/img/flipselector_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 5472 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/frame_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/frame_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4741 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/gengrid_inheritance_tree.eps2794
-rw-r--r--doc/img/gengrid_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 8420 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/genlist.eps5779
-rw-r--r--doc/img/genlist.pngbin0 -> 6441 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/genlist_inheritance_tree.eps2764
-rw-r--r--doc/img/genlist_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 8286 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/gesture_layer_inheritance_tree.eps831
-rw-r--r--doc/img/gesture_layer_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 3545 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/glview_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/glview_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2369 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/grid_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/grid_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2171 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/hover_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/hover_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4689 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/hoversel_inheritance_tree.eps1498
-rw-r--r--doc/img/hoversel_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 5783 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/icon_inheritance_tree.eps858
-rw-r--r--doc/img/icon_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 3098 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/image_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/image_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2375 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/index_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/index_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4824 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/inwin_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/inwin_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4571 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/label_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/label_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4574 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout-predefined.eps286
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout-predefined.pngbin0 -> 7475 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_box.eps395
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_box.pngbin0 -> 7012 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_colspan.eps296
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_colspan.pngbin0 -> 4232 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_inheritance_tree.eps970
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 3833 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_swallow.eps324
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_swallow.pngbin0 -> 5099 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_table.eps443
-rw-r--r--doc/img/layout_table.pngbin0 -> 10137 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/list.eps1784
-rw-r--r--doc/img/list.pngbin0 -> 5756 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/list_inheritance_tree.eps2764
-rw-r--r--doc/img/list_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 7904 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/map_inheritance_tree.eps1344
-rw-r--r--doc/img/map_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4530 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/mapbuf_inheritance_tree.eps970
-rw-r--r--doc/img/mapbuf_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4087 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/menu_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/menu_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2307 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/multibuttonentry_inheritance_tree.eps1774
-rw-r--r--doc/img/multibuttonentry_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 6842 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/naviframe_inheritance_tree.eps1311
-rw-r--r--doc/img/naviframe_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 5144 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/notify_inheritance_tree.eps970
-rw-r--r--doc/img/notify_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 3827 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/panel_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/panel_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4693 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/panes.eps1784
-rw-r--r--doc/img/panes.pngbin0 -> 3925 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/panes_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/panes_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4769 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/photo_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/photo_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2440 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/photocam_inheritance_tree.eps1435
-rw-r--r--doc/img/photocam_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4938 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/player_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/player_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4702 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/plug_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/plug_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2306 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/popup_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/popup_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4491 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/prefs.epsbin0 -> 470194 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/prefs.pngbin0 -> 6210 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/prefs_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/prefs_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2459 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/progressbar_inheritance_tree.eps1407
-rw-r--r--doc/img/progressbar_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 6660 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/radio_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/radio_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4671 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/route_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/route_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2291 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/anchorblock_01.eps8303
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/anchorblock_01.pngbin0 -> 67175 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/check_example_01.eps374
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/check_example_01.pngbin0 -> 1900 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/ctxpopup_example_01.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/ctxpopup_example_01.pngbin0 -> 18023 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/ctxpopup_example_01_a.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/ctxpopup_example_01_a.pngbin0 -> 32698 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/ctxpopup_example_01_b.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/ctxpopup_example_01_b.pngbin0 -> 24344 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_button_example_00.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_button_example_00.pngbin0 -> 20930 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_button_example_01.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_button_example_01.pngbin0 -> 35686 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_button_example_02.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_button_example_02.pngbin0 -> 21115 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_button_example_03.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_button_example_03.pngbin0 -> 41517 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_00.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_00.pngbin0 -> 20188 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_01.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_01.pngbin0 -> 37204 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_02.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_02.pngbin0 -> 19818 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_03.eps12586
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_03.pngbin0 -> 41517 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/hover_example_01_a.eps3355
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/hover_example_01_a.pngbin0 -> 13345 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/hoversel_example_01_a.eps4894
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/hoversel_example_01_a.pngbin0 -> 14984 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/icon_example_01.eps1827
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/icon_example_01.pngbin0 -> 18111 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/index_example_00.eps15048
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/index_example_00.pngbin0 -> 54505 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/index_example_01.eps15048
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/index_example_01.pngbin0 -> 69587 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/layout_example_01.eps15294
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/layout_example_01.pngbin0 -> 16603 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/layout_example_02.eps8155
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/layout_example_02.pngbin0 -> 9506 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/layout_example_03.eps2248
-rw-r--r--doc/img/screenshots/layout_example_03.pngbin0 -> 4962 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/scroller_inheritance_tree.eps2774
-rw-r--r--doc/img/scroller_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 7838 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/segment_control.eps1267
-rw-r--r--doc/img/segment_control.pngbin0 -> 3835 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/segment_control_inheritance_tree.eps1745
-rw-r--r--doc/img/segment_control_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 7014 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/separator_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/separator_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4908 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/slider_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/slider_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4800 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/slideshow_inheritance_tree.eps1282
-rw-r--r--doc/img/slideshow_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 5316 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/spinner_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/spinner_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4970 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/table_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/table_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2384 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/thumb_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/thumb_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2454 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/toolbar.eps2103
-rw-r--r--doc/img/toolbar.pngbin0 -> 6624 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/toolbar_inheritance_tree.eps1344
-rw-r--r--doc/img/toolbar_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4456 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/video_inheritance_tree.eps1234
-rw-r--r--doc/img/video_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 4748 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/web_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/web_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2168 bytes
-rw-r--r--doc/img/win_inheritance_tree.eps637
-rw-r--r--doc/img/win_inheritance_tree.pngbin0 -> 2145 bytes
-rwxr-xr-xdoc/shot.sh18
-rwxr-xr-xdoc/widget_hierarchy.py176
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/Makefile.am185
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_actionslider.c13
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_bg.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_box.c30
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_bubble1.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_bubble2.c15
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_bubble3.c13
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_button1.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_button2.c15
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_button3.c13
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_calendar.c8
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_check1.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_check2.c15
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_check3.c13
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_clock.c8
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_colorselector.c14
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_combobox.c48
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_conformant.c42
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_ctxpopup.c29
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_datetime1.c16
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_datetime2.c19
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_datetime3.c19
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_dayselector.c16
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_diskselector.c17
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_entry1.c11
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_entry2.c11
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_entry3.c14
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_entry4.c16
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_fileselector.c8
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_fileselector_button1.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_fileselector_button2.c15
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_fileselector_button3.c13
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_fileselector_entry.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_flip.c27
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_flipselector.c11
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_frame.c17
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_gengrid.c52
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_genlist1.c57
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_genlist2.c47
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_genlist3.c47
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_genlist4.c47
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_genlist5.c47
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_hover.c13
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_hoversel.c23
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_icon.c11
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_image.c11
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_index.c41
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_inwin1.c17
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_inwin2.c18
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_inwin3.c18
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_label.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_layout.c23
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_list.c46
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_map.c46
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_mapbuf.c29
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_menu.c11
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_notify.c15
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_panel.c15
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_panes.c22
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_photocam.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_popup.c15
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_prefs.c24
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_prefs.epc60
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_progressbar.c26
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_radio.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_scroller.c14
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_segment_control.c21
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_separator.c8
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_slider.c8
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_slideshow.c35
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_spinner.c8
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_table.c32
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_thumb.c12
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_tmpl_foot.c10
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_tmpl_head.c21
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_toolbar.c13
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_web.c12
-rw-r--r--doc/widgets/widget_preview_win.c8
296 files changed, 459423 insertions, 0 deletions
diff --git a/doc/elementary_examples.dox b/doc/elementary_examples.dox
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..8be745e
--- /dev/null
+++ b/doc/elementary_examples.dox
@@ -0,0 +1,6880 @@
1/**
2 * @page Examples Examples
3 *
4 * Here is a list of all Elementary examples.
5 *
6 * @ref bg_01_example_page
7 *
8 * @ref bg_02_example_page
9 *
10 * @ref bg_03_example_page
11 *
12 * @ref actionslider_example_page
13 *
14 * @ref transit_example_01_explained
15 *
16 * @ref transit_example_02_explained
17 *
18 * @ref general_functions_example_page
19 *
20 * @ref calendar_example_01
21 *
22 * @ref calendar_example_02
23 *
24 * @ref calendar_example_03
25 *
26 * @ref calendar_example_04
27 *
28 * @ref calendar_example_05
29 *
30 * @ref calendar_example_06
31 *
32 * @ref combobox_example_01
33 *
34 * @ref spinner_example
35 *
36 * @ref slider_example
37 *
38 * @ref panes_example
39 *
40 * @ref clock_example
41 *
42 * @ref datetime_example
43 *
44 * @ref dayselector_example
45 *
46 * @ref mapbuf_example
47 *
48 * @ref map_example_01
49 *
50 * @ref map_example_02
51 *
52 * @ref map_example_03
53 *
54 * @ref diskselector_example_01
55 *
56 * @ref diskselector_example_02
57 *
58 * @ref entry_example
59 *
60 * @ref list_example_01
61 *
62 * @ref list_example_02
63 *
64 * @ref list_example_03
65 *
66 * @ref toolbar_example_01
67 *
68 * @ref toolbar_example_02
69 *
70 * @ref toolbar_example_03
71 *
72 * @ref segment_control_example
73 *
74 * @ref flipselector_example
75 *
76 * @ref fileselector_example
77 *
78 * @ref fileselector_button_example
79 *
80 * @ref fileselector_entry_example
81 *
82 * @ref index_example_01
83 *
84 * @ref index_example_02
85 *
86 * @ref gengrid_example
87 *
88 * @ref genlist_example_01
89 *
90 * @ref genlist_example_02
91 *
92 * @ref genlist_example_03
93 *
94 * @ref genlist_example_04
95 *
96 * @ref genlist_example_05
97 *
98 * @ref glview_example_01_page
99 *
100 * @ref thumb_example_01
101 *
102 * @ref progressbar_example
103 *
104 * @ref slideshow_example
105 *
106 * @ref efl_thread_1
107 *
108 * @ref efl_thread_2
109 *
110 * @ref efl_thread_3
111 *
112 * @ref efl_thread_4
113 *
114 * @ref efl_thread_5
115 *
116 * @ref efl_thread_6
117 *
118 * @ref prefs_example_01
119 *
120 * @ref prefs_example_02
121 *
122 * @ref prefs_example_03
123 */
124
125/**
126 * @page bg_01_example_page elm_bg - Plain color background.
127 * @dontinclude bg_example_01.c
128 *
129 * The full code for this example can be found at @ref bg_example_01_c,
130 * in the function @c test_bg_plain. It's part of the @c elementary_test
131 * suite, and thus has the code for the three examples referenced by this
132 * documentation.
133 *
134 * This first example just sets a default background with a plain color. The
135 * first part consists of creating an Elementary window. It's the common
136 * piece of code that you'll see everywhere in Elementary: @skip elm_main
137 * @until autodel_set
138 *
139 * Now we really create our background object, using the window object as
140 * its parent:
141 *
142 * @skipline bg_add
143 *
144 * Then we set the size hints of the background object so that it will use
145 * all space available for it, and then add it as a resize object to the
146 * window, making it visible in the end:
147 *
148 * @skip size_hint_weight_set
149 * @until resize_object_add
150 *
151 * See evas_object_size_hint_weight_set() and elm_win_resize_object_add()
152 * for more detailed info about these functions.
153 *
154 * The end of the example is quite simple, just setting the minimum and
155 * maximum size of the background, so the Elementary window knows that it
156 * has to have at least the minimum size. The background also won't scale to
157 * a size above its maximum. Then we resize the window and show it in the
158 * end:
159 *
160 * @skip set size hints
161 * @until }
162 *
163 * And here we finish our very simple background object usage example.
164 */
165
166/**
167 * @page bg_02_example_page elm_bg - Image background.
168 * @dontinclude bg_example_02.c
169 *
170 * The full code for this example can be found at @ref bg_example_02_c,
171 * in the function @c test_bg_image. It's part of the @c elementary_test
172 * suite, and thus has the code for the three examples referenced by this
173 * documentation.
174 *
175 * This is the second example, and shows how to use the Elementary
176 * background object to set an image as background of your application.
177 *
178 * We start this example exactly in the same way as the previous one, even
179 * when creating the background object:
180 *
181 * @skip elm_main
182 * @until bg_add
183 *
184 * Now it's the different part.
185 *
186 * Our background will have an image, that will be displayed over the
187 * background color. Before loading the image, we set the load size of the
188 * image. The load size is a hint about the size that we want the image
189 * displayed in the screen. It's not the exact size that the image will have,
190 * but usually a bit bigger. The background object can still be scaled to a
191 * size bigger than the one set here. Setting the image load size to
192 * something smaller than its real size will reduce the memory used to keep
193 * the pixmap representation of the image, and the time to load it. Here we
194 * set the load size to 20x20 pixels, but the image is loaded with a size
195 * bigger than that (since it's just a hint):
196 *
197 * @skipline load_size_set
198 *
199 * And set our background image to be centered, instead of stretched or
200 * scaled, so the effect of the elm_bg_load_size_set() can be easily
201 * understood:
202 *
203 * @skipline option_set
204 *
205 * We need a filename to set, so we get one from the previous installed
206 * images in the @c PACKAGE_DATA_DIR, and write its full path to a buffer.
207 * Then we use this buffer to set the filename in the background object:
208 *
209 * @skip snprintf
210 * @until bg_file_set
211 *
212 * Notice that the third argument of the elm_bg_file_set() function is @c
213 * NULL, since we are setting an image to this background. This function
214 * also supports setting an edje group as background, in which case the @c
215 * group parameter wouldn't be @c NULL, but be the name of the group
216 * instead.
217 *
218 * Finally, we can set the size hints, add the background as a resize
219 * object, and resize the window, exactly the same thing we do in the @ref
220 * bg_01_example_page example:
221 *
222 * @skip size_hint
223 * @until }
224 *
225 * And this is the end of this example.
226 *
227 * This example will look like this:
228 *
229 * @image html screenshots/bg_01.png
230 * @image latex screenshots/bg_01.eps width=\textwidth
231 */
232
233/**
234 * @page bg_03_example_page elm_bg - Background properties.
235 * @dontinclude bg_example_03.c
236 *
237 * The full code for this example can be found at @ref bg_example_03_c, in the
238 * function @c test_bg_options, with the callbacks @c _cb_overlay_changed, @c
239 * _cb_color_changed and @c _cb_radio_changed defined in the beginning of the
240 * file. It's part of the @c elementary_test suite, and thus has the code for
241 * the three examples referenced by this documentation.
242 *
243 * This example will show the properties available for the background object,
244 * and will use of some more widgets to set them.
245 *
246 * In order to do this, we will set some callbacks for these widgets. The
247 * first is for the radio buttons that will be used to choose the option
248 * passed as argument to elm_bg_option_set():
249 *
250 * @skip _cb_radio_changed
251 * @until }
252 *
253 * The next callback will be used when setting the overlay (using
254 * elm_object_content_set()):
255 *
256 * @skip _cb_overlay_changed
257 * @until }
258 * @until }
259 *
260 * And the last one, used to set the color (with elm_bg_color_set()):
261 *
262 * @skip _cb_color_changed
263 * @until }
264 *
265 * We will get back to what these functions do soon. If you want to know more
266 * about how to set these callbacks and what these widgets are, look for:
267 * @li elm_radio_add()
268 * @li elm_check_add()
269 * @li elm_spinner_add()
270 *
271 * Now going to the main function, @c test_bg_options, we have the common
272 * code with the other examples:
273 *
274 * @skip bg-options
275 * @until autodel_set
276 *
277 * We add a plain background to this window, so it will have the default
278 * background color behind everything:
279 *
280 * @skip bg = elm_bg_add
281 * @until evas_object_show(bg)
282 *
283 * Then we add a vertical box (elm_box_add()) that will hold the background
284 * object that we are going to play with, as well as a horizontal box that
285 * will hold widgets:
286 *
287 * @skip elm_box_add
288 * @until evas_object_show
289 *
290 * Now we add the background object that is going to be of use for our
291 * example. It is an image background, as used in @ref bg_02_example_page ,
292 * so the code should be familiar:
293 *
294 * @skip elm_bg_add
295 * @until evas_object_show
296 *
297 * Notice the call to elm_box_pack_end(): it will pack the background object
298 * in the end of the Elementary box declared above. Just refer to that
299 * documentation for more info.
300 *
301 * Since this Elementary background is already an image background, we are
302 * going to play with its other properties. We will change its option
303 * (CENTER, SCALE, STRETCH, TILE), its color (RGB), and add an overlay to it.
304 * For all of these properties, we are going to add widgets that will
305 * configure them.
306 *
307 * First, lets add the horizontal box that will hold these widgets:
308 * @skip hbox
309 * @until align_set
310 *
311 * For now, just consider this @c hbox as a rectangle that will contain the
312 * widgets, and will distribute them horizontally inside its content. Then we
313 * add radio buttons that will allow us to choose the property to use with
314 * this background:
315 *
316 * @skip radio_add
317 * @until evas_object_show
318 *
319 * Again, I won't give details about the use of these widgets, just look for
320 * their documentation if necessary. It's enough to know for now that we are
321 * packing them in the @c hbox, setting a label for them, and the most
322 * important parts: setting its value to @c ELM_BG_OPTION_CENTER and its
323 * callback to @c _cb_radio_changed (the function defined in the beginning of
324 * this example). We do this for the next 3 radio buttons added after this
325 * one, each of them with a different value.
326 *
327 * Now taking a look at the code of the callback @c _cb_radio_changed again,
328 * it will call elm_bg_option_set() with the value set from the checked radio
329 * button, thus setting the option for this background. The background is
330 * passed as argument to the @p data parameter of this callback, and is
331 * referenced here as @c o_bg.
332 *
333 * Later we set the default value for this radio button:
334 *
335 * @skipline elm_radio_value_set
336 *
337 * Then we add a checkbox for the elm_object_content_set() function for the bg:
338 *
339 * @skip check_add
340 * @until evas_object_show
341 *
342 * Now look at the code of the @c _cb_overlay_changed again. If the checkbox
343 * state is checked, an overlay will be added to the background. It's done by
344 * creating an Edje object, and setting it with elm_object_content_set() to the
345 * background object. For information about what are and how to set Edje
346 * object, look at the Edje documentation.
347 *
348 * Finally we add a spinner object (elm_spinner_add()) to be used to select
349 * the color of our background. In its callback it's possible to see the call
350 * to elm_bg_color_set(), which will change the color of this background.
351 * This color is used by the background to fill areas where the image doesn't
352 * cover (in this case, where we have an image background). The spinner is
353 * also packed into the @c hbox :
354 *
355 * @skip elm_spinner_add
356 * @until evas_object_show
357 *
358 * Then we just have to pack the @c hbox inside the @c box, set some size
359 * hints, and show our window:
360 *
361 * @skip pack_end
362 * @until }
363 *
364 * Now to see this code in action, open elementary_test, and go to the "Bg
365 * Options" test. It should demonstrate what was implemented here.
366 */
367
368/**
369 * @page actionslider_example_page Actionslider usage
370 * @dontinclude actionslider_example_01.c
371 *
372 * For this example we are going to assume knowledge of evas smart callbacks
373 * and some basic evas object functions. Elementary is not meant to be used
374 * without evas, if you're not yet familiar with evas it probably is worth
375 * checking that out.
376 *
377 * And now to the example, when using Elementary we start by including
378 * Elementary.h:
379 * @skipline #include
380 *
381 * Next we define some callbacks, they all share the same signature because
382 * they are all to be used with evas_object_smart_callback_add().
383 * The first one just prints the selected label(in two different ways):
384 * @until }
385 *
386 * This next callback is a little more interesting, it makes the selected
387 * label magnetic(except if it's the center label):
388 * @until }
389 *
390 * This callback enables or disables the magnetic property of the center
391 * label:
392 * @until }
393 *
394 * And finally a callback to stop the main loop when the window is closed:
395 * @until }
396 *
397 * To be able to create our actionsliders we need to do some setup, but this
398 * isn't really relevant here, so if you want to know about that go @ref
399 * Win "here".
400 *
401 * With all that boring stuff out of the way we can proceed to creating some
402 * actionsliders.@n
403 * All actionsliders are created the same way:
404 * @skipline actionslider_add
405 * Next we must choose where the indicator starts, and for this one we choose
406 * the right, and set the right as magnetic:
407 * @skipline indicator_pos_set
408 * @until magnet_pos_set
409 *
410 * We then set the labels for the left and right, passing NULL as an argument
411 * to any of the labels makes that position have no label.
412 * @until Stop
413 *
414 * Furthermore we mark both left and right as enabled positions, if we didn't
415 * do this all three positions would be enabled:
416 * @until RIGHT
417 *
418 * Having the enabled positions we now add a smart callback to change
419 * which position is magnetic, so that only the last selected position is
420 * magnetic:
421 * @until NULL
422 *
423 * And finally we set our printing callback and show the actionslider:
424 * @until object_show
425 * @skip pack_end
426 *
427 * For our next actionslider we are going to do much as we did for the
428 * previous except we are going to have the center as the magnet(and not
429 * change it):
430 * @skipline actionslider_add
431 * @skipline indicator_pos_set
432 * @until object_show
433 *
434 * And another actionslider, in this one the indicator starts on the left.
435 * It has labels only in the center and right, and both positions are
436 * magnetic. Because the left doesn't have a label and is not magnetic once
437 * the indicator leaves it can't return:
438 * @skipline actionslider_add
439 * @skipline indicator_pos_set
440 * @until object_show
441 * @note The greyed out area is a @ref Styles "style".
442 *
443 * And now an actionslider with a label in the indicator, and whose magnet
444 * properties change based on what was last selected:
445 * @skipline actionslider_add
446 * @skipline indicator_pos_set
447 * @until object_show
448 * @note The greyed out area is a @ref Styles "style".
449 *
450 * We are almost done, this next one is just an actionslider with all
451 * positions magnetized and having every possible label:
452 * @skipline actionslider_add
453 * @skipline indicator_pos_set
454 * @until object_show
455 *
456 * And for our last actionslider we have one that turns the magnetic property
457 * on and off:
458 * @skipline actionslider_add
459 * @skipline indicator_pos_set
460 * @until object_show
461 *
462 * The example will look like this:
463 *
464 * @image html screenshots/actionslider_01.png
465 * @image latex screenshots/actionslider_01.eps width=\textwidth
466 *
467 * See the full source code @ref actionslider_example_01 "here"
468 */
469
470/**
471 * @page transit_example_03_c elm_transit - Combined effects and options.
472 *
473 * This example shows how to apply the following transition effects:
474 * @li translation
475 * @li color
476 * @li rotation
477 * @li wipe
478 * @li zoom
479 * @li resizing
480 *
481 * It allows you to apply more than one effect at once, and also allows to
482 * set properties like event_enabled, auto_reverse, repeat_times and
483 * tween_mode.
484 *
485 * @include transit_example_03.c
486 * @example transit_example_03.c
487 */
488
489/**
490 * @page transit_example_04_c elm_transit - Combined effects over two objects.
491 *
492 * This example shows how to apply the transition effects:
493 * @li flip
494 * @li resizable_flip
495 * @li fade
496 * @li blend
497 * over two objects. This kind of transition effect is used to make one
498 * object disappear and another one appear on its place.
499 *
500 * You can mix more than one effect of this type on the same objects, and the
501 * transition will apply both.
502 *
503 * @include transit_example_04.c
504 * @example transit_example_04.c
505 */
506
507/**
508 * @page transit_example_01_explained elm_transit - Basic transit usage.
509 * @dontinclude transit_example_01.c
510 *
511 * The full code for this example can be found at @ref transit_example_01_c.
512 *
513 * This example shows the simplest way of creating a transition and applying
514 * it to an object. Similarly to every other elementary example, we create a
515 * window, set its title, size, autodel property, and setup a callback to
516 * exit the program when finished:
517 *
518 * @skip on_done
519 * @until evas_object_resize
520 *
521 * We also add a resizable white background to use behind our animation:
522 *
523 * @skip bg_add
524 * @until evas_object_show
525 *
526 * And then we add a button that we will use to demonstrate the effects of
527 * our animation:
528 *
529 * @skip button_add
530 * @until evas_object_show(win)
531 *
532 * Notice that we are not adding the button with elm_win_resize_object_add()
533 * because we don't want the window to control the size of the button. We
534 * will use the transition to change the button size, so it could conflict
535 * with something else trying to control that size.
536 *
537 * Now, the simplest code possible to create the resize animation:
538 *
539 * @skip transit_add
540 * @until transit_go
541 *
542 * As you can see, this code is very easy to understand. First, we create the
543 * transition itself with elm_transit_add(). Then we add the button to this
544 * transition with elm_transit_object_add(), which means that the transition
545 * will operate over this button. The effect that we want now is changing the
546 * object size from 100x50 to 300x150, and can be achieved by adding the
547 * resize effect with elm_transit_effect_resizing_add().
548 *
549 * Finally, we set the transition time to 5 seconds and start the transition
550 * with elm_transit_go(). If we wanted more effects applied to this
551 * button, we could add them to the same transition. See the
552 * @ref transit_example_03_c to watch many transitions being applied to an
553 * object.
554 */
555
556/**
557 * @page transit_example_02_explained elm_transit - Chained transitions.
558 * @dontinclude transit_example_02.c
559 *
560 * The full code for this example can be found at @ref transit_example_02_c.
561 *
562 * This example shows how to implement a chain of transitions. This chain is
563 * used to start a transition just after another transition ended. Similarly
564 * to every other elementary example, we create a window, set its title,
565 * size, autodel property, and setup a callback to exit the program when
566 * finished:
567 *
568 * @skip on_done
569 * @until evas_object_resize
570 *
571 * We also add a resizable white background to use behind our animation:
572 *
573 * @skip bg_add
574 * @until evas_object_show
575 *
576 * This example will have a chain of 4 transitions, each of them applied to
577 * one button. Thus we create 4 different buttons:
578 *
579 * @skip button_add
580 * @until evas_object_show(bt4)
581 *
582 * Now we create a simple translation transition that will be started as soon
583 * as the program loads. It will be our first transition, and the other
584 * transitions will be started just after this transition ends:
585 *
586 * @skip transit_add
587 * @until transit_go
588 *
589 * The code displayed until now has nothing different from what you have
590 * already seen in @ref transit_example_01_explained, but now comes the new
591 * part: instead of creating a second transition that will start later using
592 * a timer, we create the it normally, and use
593 * elm_transit_chain_transit_add() instead of elm_transit_go. Since we are
594 * adding it in a chain after the first transition, it will start as soon as
595 * the first transition ends:
596 *
597 * @skip transit_add
598 * @until transit_chain_transit_add
599 *
600 * Finally we add the 2 other transitions to the chain, and run our program.
601 * It will make one transition start after the other finish, and there is the
602 * transition chain.
603 */
604
605/**
606 * @page general_functions_example_page General (top-level) functions example
607 * @dontinclude general_funcs_example.c
608 *
609 * As told in their documentation blocks, the
610 * elm_app_compile_*_dir_set() family of functions have to be called
611 * before elm_app_info_set():
612 * @skip tell elm about
613 * @until elm_app_info_set
614 *
615 * We are here setting the fallback paths to the compiling time target
616 * paths, naturally. If you're building the example out of the
617 * project's build system, we're assuming they are the canonical ones.
618 *
619 * After the program starts, elm_app_info_set() will actually run and
620 * then you'll see an intrincasy: Elementary does the prefix lookup @b
621 * twice. This is so because of the quicklaunch infrastructure in
622 * Elementary (@ref Start), which will register a predefined prefix
623 * for possible users of the launch schema. We're not hooking into a
624 * quick launch, so this first call can't be avoided.
625 *
626 * If you ran this example from your "bindir" installation
627 * directory, no output will emerge from these both attempts -- it
628 * will find the "magic" file there registered and set the prefixes
629 * silently. Otherwise, you could get something like:
630 @verbatim
631 WARNING: Could not determine its installed prefix for 'ELM'
632 so am falling back on the compiled in default:
633 usr
634 implied by the following:
635 bindir = usr/lib
636 libdir = usr/lib
637 datadir = usr/share/elementary
638 localedir = usr/share/locale
639 Try setting the following environment variables:
640 ELM_PREFIX - points to the base prefix of install
641 or the next 4 variables
642 ELM_BIN_DIR - provide a specific binary directory
643 ELM_LIB_DIR - provide a specific library directory
644 ELM_DATA_DIR - provide a specific data directory
645 ELM_LOCALE_DIR - provide a specific locale directory
646 @endverbatim
647 * if you also didn't change those environment variables (remember
648 * they are also a valid way of communicating your prefix to the
649 * binary) - this is the scenario where it fallbacks to the paths set
650 * for compile time.
651 *
652 * Then, you can check the prefixes set on the standard output:
653 * @skip prefix was set to
654 * @until locale directory is
655 *
656 * In the fragment
657 * @skip by using this policy
658 * @until elm_win_autodel_set
659 * we demonstrate the use of Elementary policies. The policy defining
660 * under which circumstances our application should quit automatically
661 * is set to when its last window is closed (this one has just one
662 * window, though). This will save us from having to set a callback
663 * ourselves on the window, like done in @ref bg_example_01_c "this"
664 * example. Note that we need to tell the window to delete itself's
665 * object on a request to destroy the canvas coming, with
666 * elm_win_autodel_set().
667 *
668 * What follows is some boilerplate code, creating a frame with a @b
669 * button, our object of interest, and, below, widgets to change the
670 * button's behavior and exemplify the group of functions in question.
671 *
672 * @dontinclude general_funcs_example.c
673 * We enabled the focus highlight object for this window, so that you
674 * can keep track of the current focused object better:
675 * @skip elm_win_focus_highlight_enabled_set
676 * @until evas_object_show
677 * Use the tab key to navigate through the focus chain.
678 *
679 * @dontinclude general_funcs_example.c
680 * While creating the button, we exemplify how to use Elementary's
681 * finger size information to scale our UI:
682 * @skip fprintf(stdout, "Elementary
683 * @until evas_object_show
684 *
685 * @dontinclude general_funcs_example.c
686 * The first checkbox's callback is:
687 * @skip static void
688 * @until }
689 * When unsetting the checkbox, we disable the button, which will get a new
690 * decoration (greyed out) and stop receiving events. The focus chain
691 * will also ignore it.
692 *
693 * Following, there are 2 more buttons whose actions are focus/unfocus
694 * the top button, respectively:
695 * @skip focus callback
696 * @until }
697 * and
698 * @skip unfocus callback
699 * @until }
700 * Note the situations in which they won't take effect:
701 * - the button is not allowed to get focus or
702 * - the button is disabled
703 *
704 * The first restriction above you'll get by a second checkbox, whose
705 * callback is:
706 * @skip focus allow callback
707 * @until }
708 * Note that the button will still get mouse events, though.
709 *
710 * Next, there's a slider controlling the button's scale:
711 * @skip scaling callback
712 * @until }
713 *
714 * Experiment with it, so you understand the effect better. If you
715 * change its value, it will mess with the button's original size,
716 * naturally.
717 *
718 * The full code for this example can be found
719 * @ref general_functions_example_c "here".
720 */
721
722/**
723 * @page theme_example_01 Theme - Using extensions
724 *
725 * @dontinclude theme_example_01.c
726 *
727 * Using extensions is extremely easy, discarding the part where you have to
728 * write the theme for them.
729 *
730 * In the following example we'll be creating two buttons, one to load or
731 * unload our extension theme and one to cycle around three possible styles,
732 * one of which we created.
733 *
734 * After including our one and only header we'll jump to the callback for
735 * the buttons. First one takes care of loading or unloading our extension
736 * file, relative to the default theme set (thus the @c NULL in the
737 * functions first parameter).
738 * @skipline Elementary.h
739 * @skip static void
740 * @until }
741 * @until }
742 * @until }
743 *
744 * The second button, as we said before, will just switch around different
745 * styles. In this case we have three of them. The first one is our custom
746 * style, named after something very unlikely to find in the default theme.
747 * The other two styles are the standard and one more, anchor, which exists
748 * in the default and is similar to the default, except the button vanishes
749 * when the mouse is not over it.
750 * @skip static void
751 * @until }
752 * @until }
753 *
754 * So what happens if the style switches to our custom one when the
755 * extension is loaded? Elementary falls back to the default for the
756 * widget.
757 *
758 * And the main function, simply enough, will create the window, set the
759 * buttons and their callbacks, and just to begin with our button styled
760 * we're also loading our extension at the beginning.
761 * @skip int
762 * @until ELM_MAIN
763 *
764 * In this case we wanted to easily remove extensions, but all adding an
765 * extension does is tell Elementary where else it should look for themes
766 * when it can't find them in the default theme. Another way to do this
767 * is to set the theme search order using elm_theme_set(), but this requires
768 * that the developer is careful not to override any user configuration.
769 * That can be helped by adding our theme to the end of whatever is already
770 * set, like in the following snippet.
771 * @code
772 * char buf[4096];
773 * snprintf(buf, sizeof(buf), "%s:./theme_example.edj", elme_theme_get(NULL);
774 * elm_theme_set(NULL, buf);
775 * @endcode
776 *
777 * If we were using overlays instead of extensions, the same thing applies,
778 * but the custom theme must be added to the front of the search path.
779 *
780 * In the end, we should be looking at something like this:
781 *
782 * @image html screenshots/theme_example_01.png
783 * @image latex screenshots/theme_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
784 *
785 * That's all. Boringly simple, and the full code in one piece can be found
786 * @ref theme_example_01.c "here".
787 *
788 * And the code for our extension is @ref theme_example.edc "here".
789 *
790 * @example theme_example_01.c
791 * @example theme_example.edc
792 */
793
794/**
795 * @page theme_example_02 Theme - Using overlays
796 *
797 * @dontinclude theme_example_02.c
798 *
799 * Overlays are like extensions in that you tell Elementary that some other
800 * theme contains the styles you need for your program. The difference is that
801 * they will be look in first, so they can override the default style of any
802 * widget.
803 *
804 * There's not much to say about them that hasn't been said in our previous
805 * example about @ref theme_example_01 "extensions", so going quickly through
806 * the code we have a function to load or unload the theme, which will be
807 * called when we click any button.
808 * @skipline Elementary.h
809 * @skip static void
810 * @until }
811 *
812 * And the main function, creating the window and adding some buttons to it.
813 * We load our theme as an overlay and nothing else. Notice there's no style
814 * set for any button there, which means they should be using the default
815 * that we override.
816 * @skip int
817 * @until ELM_MAIN
818 *
819 * That's pretty much it. The full code is @ref theme_example_02.c "here" and
820 * the definition of the theme is the same as before, and can be found in
821 * @ref theme_example.edc "here".
822 *
823 * @example theme_example_02.c
824 */
825
826 /**
827 * @page button_example_00 Button - Hello, Button!
828 *
829 * @dontinclude button_example_00.c
830 *
831 * Keeping the tradition, this is a simple "Hello, World" button example. We
832 * will show how to create a button and associate and action to be performed
833 * when you click on it.
834 *
835 * In the end, we'll be presented with something that looks like this:
836 *
837 * @image html screenshots/button_00.png
838 * @image latex screenshots/button_00.eps width=\textwidth
839 *
840 * The full code of the example is @ref button_example_00.c "here" and we
841 * will follow here with a rundown of it.
842 *
843 *
844 * There is only one button on the interface which performs a basic action:
845 * close the application. This behavior is described by on_click() function,
846 * that interrupt the program invoking elm_exit().
847 * @skip static void
848 * @until }
849 *
850 *
851 * On the main() function, we set the basic characteristics of the user
852 * interface. First we use the Elementary library to create a window and
853 * set its policies (such as close when the user click on the window close
854 * icon).
855 *
856 * @skip elm_win_add
857 * @until elm_policy_set
858 *
859 * In order to turn it visible on the WM (Window Manager), we also have to
860 * associate it to a canvas through Evas library, and set its dimensions.
861 *
862 * @skip evas_object_resize
863 * @until evas_object_show(win)
864 *
865 * Then we create a background associated to the window, define its dimensions,
866 * and turn it visible on the canvas.
867 * @skip elm_bg_add
868 * @until evas_object_show(bg)
869 *
870 *
871 * Finally we use Elementary to create a button and Evas to set its
872 * proprieties. Here we have not only to give the button dimensions, but also
873 * its coordinates and the action to be performed on the click event.
874 * @skip elm_button_add
875 * @until evas_object_show(btn)
876 *
877 *
878 * And we are done.
879 *
880 * @example button_example_00.c
881 */
882
883/**
884 * @page button_example_01 Button - Complete example
885 *
886 * @dontinclude button_example_01.c
887 *
888 * A button is simple, you click on it and something happens. That said,
889 * we'll go through an example to show in detail the button API less
890 * commonly used.
891 *
892 * In the end, we'll be presented with something that looks like this:
893 *
894 * @image html screenshots/button_01.png
895 * @image latex screenshots/button_01.eps width=\textwidth
896 *
897 * The full code of the example is @ref button_example_01.c "here" and we
898 * will follow here with a rundown of it.
899 *
900 * @skip Elementary.h
901 * @until Elementary.h
902 * @skip struct
903 * @until App_Data
904 *
905 * We have several buttons to set different times for the autorepeat timeouts
906 * of the buttons that use it and a few more that we keep track of in our
907 * data struct. The mid button doesn't do much, just moves around according
908 * to what other buttons the user presses. Then four more buttons to move the
909 * central one, and we're also keeping track of the icon set in the middle
910 * button, since when this one moves, we change the icon, and when movement
911 * is finished (by releasing one of the four arrow buttons), we set back the
912 * normal icon.
913 * @skip static void
914 * @until }
915 *
916 * Keeping any of those four buttons pressed will trigger their autorepeat
917 * callback, where we move the button doing some size hint magic. To
918 * understand how that works better, refer to the @ref Box documentation.
919 * Also, the first time the function is called, we change the icon in the
920 * middle button, using elm_object_content_unset() first to keep the reference
921 * to the previous one, so we don't need to recreate it when we are done
922 * moving it.
923 * @skip static void
924 * @until }
925 * @until size_hint_align_set
926 * @until }
927 *
928 * One more callback for the option buttons, that just sets the timeouts for
929 * the different autorepeat options.
930 *
931 * @skip static void
932 * @until }
933 * @until }
934 * @until }
935 *
936 * And the main function, which does some setting up of the buttons in boxes
937 * to make things work. Here we'll go through some snippets only.
938 *
939 * For the option buttons, it's just the button with its label and callback.
940 * @skip elm_button_add
941 * @until smart_callback_add
942 *
943 * For the ones that move the central button, we have no labels. There are
944 * icons instead, and the autorepeat option is toggled.
945 * @skip Gap: 1.0
946 * @skip elm_button_add
947 * @until data.cursors.up
948 *
949 * And just to show the mid button, which doesn't have anything special.
950 * @skip data.cursors.left
951 * @skip elm_button_add
952 * @until data.mid
953 *
954 * And we are done.
955 *
956 * @example button_example_01.c
957 */
958
959/**
960 * @page bubble_01_example_page elm_bubble - Simple use.
961 * @dontinclude bubble_example_01.c
962 *
963 * This example shows a bubble with all fields set(label, info, content and
964 * icon) and the selected corner changing when the bubble is clicked. To be
965 * able use a bubble we need to do some setup and create a window, for this
966 * example we are going to ignore that part of the code since it isn't
967 * relevant to the bubble.
968 *
969 * To have the selected corner change in a clockwise motion we are going to
970 * use the following callback:
971 * @skip static
972 * @until }
973 * @until }
974 *
975 * Here we are creating an elm_label that is going to be used as the content
976 * for our bubble:
977 * @skipline elm_label
978 * @until show
979 * @note You could use any evas_object for this, we are using an elm_label
980 * for simplicity.
981 *
982 * Despite it's name the bubble's icon doesn't have to be an icon, it can be
983 * any evas_object. For this example we are going to make the icon a simple
984 * blue rectangle:
985 * @until show
986 *
987 * And finally we have the actual bubble creation and the setting of it's
988 * label, info and content:
989 * @until content
990 * @skipline show
991 * @note Because we didn't set a corner, the default("top_left") will be
992 * used.
993 *
994 * Now that we have our bubble all that is left is connecting the "clicked"
995 * signals to our callback:
996 * @line smart_callback
997 *
998 * This last bubble we created was very complete, so it's pertinent to show
999 * that most of that stuff is optional a bubble can be created with nothing
1000 * but content:
1001 * @until content
1002 * @skipline show
1003 *
1004 * Our example will look like this:
1005 *
1006 * @image html screenshots/bubble_example_01.png
1007 * @image latex screenshots/bubble_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
1008 *
1009 * See the full source code @ref bubble_example_01.c here.
1010 * @example bubble_example_01.c
1011 */
1012
1013/**
1014 * @page box_example_01 Box - Basic API
1015 *
1016 * @dontinclude button_example_01.c
1017 *
1018 * As a special guest tonight, we have the @ref button_example_01 "simple
1019 * button example". There are plenty of boxes in it, and to make the cursor
1020 * buttons that moved a central one around when pressed, we had to use a
1021 * variety of values for their hints.
1022 *
1023 * To start, let's take a look at the handling of the central button when
1024 * we were moving it around. To achieve this effect without falling back to
1025 * a complete manual positioning of the @c Evas_Object in our canvas, we just
1026 * put it in a box and played with its alignment within it, as seen in the
1027 * following snippet of the callback for the pressed buttons.
1028 * @skip evas_object_size_hint_align_get
1029 * @until evas_object_size_hint_align_set
1030 *
1031 * Not much to it. We get the current alignment of the object and change it
1032 * by just a little, depending on which button was pressed, then set it
1033 * again, making sure we stay within the 0.0-1.0 range so the button moves
1034 * inside the space it has, instead of disappearing under the other objects.
1035 *
1036 * But as useful as an example as that may have been, the usual case with boxes
1037 * is to set everything at the moment they are created, like we did for
1038 * everything else in our main function.
1039 *
1040 * The entire layout of our program is made with boxes. We have one set as the
1041 * resize object for the window, which means it will always be resized with
1042 * the window. The weight hints set to @c EVAS_HINT_EXPAND will tell the
1043 * window that the box can grow past it's minimum size, which allows resizing
1044 * of it.
1045 * @skip elm_main
1046 * @skip elm_box_add
1047 * @until evas_object_show
1048 *
1049 * Two more boxes, set to horizontal, hold the buttons to change the autorepeat
1050 * configuration used by the buttons. We create each to take over all the
1051 * available space horizontally, but we don't want them to grow vertically,
1052 * so we keep that axis of the weight with 0.0. Then it gets packed in the
1053 * main box.
1054 * @skip box2
1055 * @until evas_object_show
1056 *
1057 * The buttons in each of those boxes have nothing special, they are just packed
1058 * in with their default values and the box will use their minimum size, as set
1059 * by Elementary itself based on the label, icon, finger size and theme.
1060 *
1061 * But the buttons used to move the central one have a special disposition.
1062 * The top one first, is placed right into the main box like our other smaller
1063 * boxes. Set to expand horizontally and not vertically, and in this case we
1064 * also tell it to fill that space, so it gets resized to take the entire
1065 * width of the window.
1066 * @skip Gap: 1.0
1067 * @skip elm_button_add
1068 * @until evas_object_show
1069 *
1070 * The bottom one will be the same, but for the other two we need to use a
1071 * second box set to take as much space as we have, so we can place our side
1072 * buttons in place and have the big empty space where the central button will
1073 * move.
1074 * @skip elm_box_add
1075 * @until evas_object_show
1076 *
1077 * Then the buttons will have their hints inverted to the other top and bottom
1078 * ones, to expand and fill vertically and keep their minimum size horizontally.
1079 * @skip elm_button_add
1080 * @until evas_object_show
1081 *
1082 * The central button takes every thing else. It will ask to be expanded in
1083 * both directions, but without filling its cell. Changing its alignment by
1084 * pressing the buttons will make it move around.
1085 * @skip elm_button_add
1086 * @until evas_object_show
1087 *
1088 * To end, the rightmost button is packed in the smaller box after the central
1089 * one, and back to the main box we have the bottom button at the end.
1090 */
1091
1092/**
1093 * @page box_example_02 Box - Layout transitions
1094 *
1095 * @dontinclude box_example_02.c
1096 *
1097 * Setting a customized layout for a box is simple once you have the layout
1098 * function, which is just like the layout function for @c Evas_Box. The new
1099 * and fancier thing we can do with Elementary is animate the transition from
1100 * one layout to the next. We'll see now how to do that through a simple
1101 * example, while also taking a look at some of the API that was left
1102 * untouched in our @ref box_example_01 "previous example".
1103 *
1104 * @image html screenshots/box_example_02.png
1105 * @image latex screenshots/box_example_02.eps width=\textwidth
1106 *
1107 * @skipline Elementary.h
1108 *
1109 * Our application data consists of a list of layout functions, given by
1110 * @c transitions. We'll be animating through them throughout the entire run.
1111 * The box with the stuff to move around and the last layout that was set to
1112 * make things easier in the code.
1113 * @skip typedef
1114 * @until Transitions_Data
1115 *
1116 * The box starts with three buttons, clicking on any of them will take it
1117 * out of the box without deleting the object. There are also two more buttons
1118 * outside, one to add an object to the box and the other to clear it.
1119 * This is all to show how you can interact with the items in the box, add
1120 * things and even remove them, while the transitions occur.
1121 *
1122 * One of the callback we'll be using creates a new button, asks the box for
1123 * the list of its children and if it's not empty, we add the new object after
1124 * the first one, otherwise just place at the end as it will not make any
1125 * difference.
1126 * @skip static void
1127 * @until }
1128 * @until }
1129 *
1130 * The clear button is even simpler. Everything in the box will be deleted,
1131 * leaving it empty and ready to fill it up with more stuff.
1132 * @skip static void
1133 * @until }
1134 *
1135 * And a little function to remove buttons from the box without deleting them.
1136 * This one is set for the @c clicked callback of the original buttons,
1137 * unpacking them when clicked and placing it somewhere in the screen where
1138 * they will not disturb. Once we do this, the box no longer has any control
1139 * of it, so it will be left untouched until the program ends.
1140 * @skip static void
1141 * @until }
1142 *
1143 * If we wanted, we could just call @c evas_object_del() on the object to
1144 * destroy it. In this case, no unpack is really necessary, as the box would
1145 * be notified of a child being deleted and adjust its calculations accordingly.
1146 *
1147 * The core of the program is the following function. It takes whatever
1148 * function is first on our list of layouts and together with the
1149 * @c last_layout, it creates an ::Elm_Box_Transition to use with
1150 * elm_box_layout_transition(). In here, we tell it to start from whatever
1151 * layout we last set, end with the one that was at the top of the list and
1152 * when everything is finished, call us back so we can create another
1153 * transition. Finally, move the new layout to the end of the list so we
1154 * can continue running through them until the program ends.
1155 * @skip static void
1156 * @until }
1157 *
1158 * The main function doesn't have anything special. Creation of box, initial
1159 * buttons and some callback setting. The only part worth mentioning is the
1160 * initialization of our application data.
1161 * @skip tdata.box
1162 * @until evas_object_box_layout_stack
1163 *
1164 * We have a simple static variable, set the box, the first layout we are
1165 * using as last and create the list with the different functions to go
1166 * through.
1167 *
1168 * And in the end, we set the first layout and call the same function we went
1169 * through before to start the run of transitions.
1170 * @until _test_box_transition_change
1171 *
1172 * For the full code, follow @ref box_example_02.c "here".
1173 *
1174 * @example box_example_02.c
1175 */
1176
1177/**
1178 * @page calendar_example_01 Calendar - Simple creation.
1179 * @dontinclude calendar_example_01.c
1180 *
1181 * As a first example, let's just display a calendar in our window,
1182 * explaining all steps required to do so.
1183 *
1184 * First you should declare objects we intend to use:
1185 * @skipline Evas_Object
1186 *
1187 * Then a window is created, a title is set and its set to be autodeleted.
1188 * More details can be found on windows examples:
1189 * @until elm_win_autodel
1190 *
1191 * Next a simple background is placed on our windows. More details on
1192 * @ref bg_01_example_page :
1193 * @until evas_object_show(bg)
1194 *
1195 * Now, the exciting part, let's add the calendar with elm_calendar_add(),
1196 * passing our window object as parent.
1197 * @until evas_object_show(cal);
1198 *
1199 * To conclude our example, we should show the window and run elm mainloop:
1200 * @until ELM_MAIN
1201 *
1202 * Our example will look like this:
1203 *
1204 * @image html screenshots/calendar_example_01.png
1205 * @image latex screenshots/calendar_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
1206 *
1207 * See the full source code @ref calendar_example_01.c here.
1208 * @example calendar_example_01.c
1209 */
1210
1211/**
1212 * @page calendar_example_02 Calendar - Layout strings formatting.
1213 * @dontinclude calendar_example_02.c
1214 *
1215 * In this simple example, we'll explain how to format the label displaying
1216 * month and year, and also set weekday names.
1217 *
1218 * To format month and year label, we need to create a callback function
1219 * to create a string given the selected time, declared under a
1220 * <tt> struct tm </tt>.
1221 *
1222 * <tt> struct tm </tt>, declared on @c time.h, is a structure composed by
1223 * nine integers:
1224 * @li tm_sec seconds [0,59]
1225 * @li tm_min minutes [0,59]
1226 * @li tm_hour hour [0,23]
1227 * @li tm_mday day of month [1,31]
1228 * @li tm_mon month of year [0,11]
1229 * @li tm_year years since 1900
1230 * @li tm_wday day of week [0,6] (Sunday = 0)
1231 * @li tm_yday day of year [0,365]
1232 * @li tm_isdst daylight savings flag
1233 * @note glib version has 2 additional fields.
1234 *
1235 * For our function, only stuff that matters are tm_mon and tm_year.
1236 * But we don't need to access it directly, since there are nice functions
1237 * to format date and time, as @c strftime.
1238 * We will get abbreviated month (%b) and year (%y) (check strftime manpage
1239 * for more) in our example:
1240 * @skipline static char
1241 * @until }
1242 *
1243 * We need to alloc the string to be returned, and calendar widget will
1244 * free it when it's not needed, what is done by @c strdup.
1245 * So let's register our callback to calendar object:
1246 * @skipline elm_calendar_format_function_set
1247 *
1248 * To set weekday names, we should declare them as an array of strings:
1249 * @dontinclude calendar_example_02.c
1250 * @skipline weekdays[]
1251 * @until }
1252 *
1253 * And finally set them to calendar:
1254 * @skipline weekdays_names_set
1255 *
1256 * Our example will look like this:
1257 *
1258 * @image html screenshots/calendar_example_02.png
1259 * @image latex screenshots/calendar_example_02.eps width=\textwidth
1260 *
1261 * See the full source code @ref calendar_example_02.c here.
1262 * @example calendar_example_02.c
1263 */
1264
1265/**
1266 * @page calendar_example_03 Calendar - Years restrictions.
1267 * @dontinclude calendar_example_03.c
1268 *
1269 * This example explains how to set max and min year to be displayed
1270 * by a calendar object. This means that user won't be able to
1271 * see or select a date before and after selected years.
1272 * By default, limits are 1902 and maximum value will depends
1273 * on platform architecture (year 2037 for 32 bits); You can
1274 * read more about time functions on @c ctime manpage.
1275 *
1276 * Straigh to the point, to set it is enough to call
1277 * elm_calendar_min_max_year_set(). First value is minimum year, second
1278 * is maximum. If first value is negative, it won't apply limit for min
1279 * year, if the second one is negative, won't apply for max year.
1280 * Setting both to negative value will clear limits (default state):
1281 * @skipline elm_calendar_min_max_year_set
1282 *
1283 * Our example will look like this:
1284 *
1285 * @image html screenshots/calendar_example_03.png
1286 * @image latex screenshots/calendar_example_03.eps width=\textwidth
1287 *
1288 * See the full source code @ref calendar_example_03.c here.
1289 * @example calendar_example_03.c
1290 */
1291
1292/**
1293 * @page calendar_example_04 Calendar - Days selection.
1294 * @dontinclude calendar_example_04.c
1295 *
1296 * It's possible to disable date selection and to select a date
1297 * from your program, and that's what we'll see on this example.
1298 *
1299 * If isn't required that users could select a day on calendar,
1300 * only interacting going through months, disabling days selection
1301 * could be a good idea to avoid confusion. For that:
1302 * @skipline elm_calendar_select_mode_set
1303 *
1304 * Also, regarding days selection, you could be interested to set a
1305 * date to be highlighted on calendar from your code, maybe when
1306 * a specific event happens, or after calendar creation. As @c time output is
1307 * in seconds, we define the number of seconds contained within a day as a
1308 * constant:
1309 * @dontinclude calendar_example_04.c
1310 * @skipline SECS_DAY
1311 *
1312 * Now let's select two days from current day:
1313 * @skipline time(NULL)
1314 * @until elm_calendar_selected_time_set
1315 *
1316 * Our example will look like this:
1317 *
1318 * @image html screenshots/calendar_example_04.png
1319 * @image latex screenshots/calendar_example_04.eps width=\textwidth
1320 *
1321 * See the full source code @ref calendar_example_04.c here.
1322 * @example calendar_example_04.c
1323 */
1324
1325/**
1326 * @page calendar_example_05 Calendar - Signal callback and getters.
1327 * @dontinclude calendar_example_05.c
1328 *
1329 * Most of setters explained on previous examples have associated getters.
1330 * That's the subject of this example. We'll add a callback to display
1331 * all calendar information every time user interacts with the calendar.
1332 *
1333 * Let's check our callback function:
1334 * @skipline static void
1335 * @until double interval;
1336 *
1337 * To get selected day, we need to call elm_calendar_selected_time_get(),
1338 * but to assure nothing wrong happened, we must check for function return.
1339 * It'll return @c EINA_FALSE if fail. Otherwise we can use time set to
1340 * our structure @p stime.
1341 * @skipline elm_calendar_selected_time_get
1342 * @until return
1343 *
1344 * Next we'll get information from calendar and place on declared vars:
1345 * @skipline interval
1346 * @until elm_calendar_weekdays_names_get
1347 *
1348 * The only tricky part is that last line gets an array of strings
1349 * (char arrays), one for each weekday.
1350 *
1351 * Then we can simple print that to stdin:
1352 * @skipline printf
1353 * @until }
1354 *
1355 * <tt> struct tm </tt> is declared on @c time.h. You can check @c ctime
1356 * manpage to read about it.
1357 *
1358 * To register this callback, that will be called every time user selects
1359 * a day or goes to next or previous month, just add a callback for signal
1360 * @b changed.
1361 * @skipline evas_object_smart_callback_add
1362 *
1363 * Our example will look like this:
1364 *
1365 * @image html screenshots/calendar_example_05.png
1366 * @image latex screenshots/calendar_example_05.eps width=\textwidth
1367 *
1368 * See the full source code @ref calendar_example_05.c here.
1369 * @example calendar_example_05.c
1370 */
1371
1372/**
1373 * @page calendar_example_06 Calendar - Calendar marks.
1374 * @dontinclude calendar_example_06.c
1375 *
1376 * On this example marks management will be explained. Functions
1377 * elm_calendar_mark_add(), elm_calendar_mark_del() and
1378 * elm_calendar_marks_clear() will be covered.
1379 *
1380 * To add a mark, will be required to choose three things:
1381 * @li mark style
1382 * @li mark date, or start date if it will be repeated
1383 * @li mark periodicity
1384 *
1385 * Style defines the kind of mark will be displayed over marked day,
1386 * on calendar. Default theme supports @b holiday and @b checked.
1387 * If more is required, is possible to set a new theme to calendar
1388 * widget using elm_object_style_set(), and use
1389 * the signal that will be used by such marks.
1390 *
1391 * Date is a <tt> struct tm </tt>, as defined by @c time.h. More can
1392 * be read on @c ctime manpage.
1393 * If a date relative from current is required, this struct can be set
1394 * as:
1395 * @skipline time(NULL)
1396 * @until localtime_r
1397 *
1398 * Or if it's an absolute date, you can just declare the struct like:
1399 * @dontinclude calendar_example_06.c
1400 * @skipline sunday
1401 * @until christmas.tm_mon
1402 *
1403 * Periodicity is how frequently the mark will be displayed over the
1404 * calendar. Can be a unique mark (that don't repeat), or it can repeat
1405 * daily, weekly, monthly or annually. It's enumerated by
1406 * @c Elm_Calendar_Mark_Repeat_Type.
1407 *
1408 * So let's add some marks to our calendar. We will add christmas holiday,
1409 * set Sundays as holidays, and check current day and day after that.
1410 * @dontinclude calendar_example_06.c
1411 * @skipline sunday
1412 * @until christmas.tm_mon
1413 * @skipline current_time
1414 * @until ELM_CALENDAR_WEEKLY
1415 *
1416 * We kept the return of first mark add, because we don't really won't it
1417 * to be checked, so let's remove it:
1418 * @skipline elm_calendar_mark_del
1419 *
1420 * After all marks are added and removed, is required to draw them:
1421 * @skipline elm_calendar_marks_draw
1422 *
1423 * Finally, to clear all marks, let's set a callback for our button:
1424 * @skipline elm_button_add
1425 * @until evas_object_show(bt);
1426 *
1427 * This callback will receive our calendar object, and should clear it:
1428 * @dontinclude calendar_example_06.c
1429 * @skipline static
1430 * @until }
1431 * @note Remember to draw marks after clear the calendar.
1432 *
1433 * Our example will look like this:
1434 *
1435 * @image html screenshots/calendar_example_06.png
1436 * @image latex screenshots/calendar_example_06.eps width=\textwidth
1437 *
1438 * See the full source code @ref calendar_example_06.c here.
1439 * @example calendar_example_06.c
1440 */
1441
1442/**
1443 * @page spinner_example Spinner widget example
1444 *
1445 * This code places seven Elementary spinner widgets on a window, each of
1446 * them exemplifying a part of the widget's API.
1447 *
1448 * The first of them is the default spinner:
1449 * @dontinclude spinner_example.c
1450 * @skipline elm_spinner_add
1451 * @until evas_object_show
1452 * As you see, the defaults for a spinner are:
1453 * @li no wrap
1454 * @li min value set to 0
1455 * @li max value set to 100
1456 * @li step value set to 1
1457 * @li label format set to "%0.f"
1458 *
1459 * If another format is required, see the second spinner. It will put a text
1460 * before and after the value, and also format value to display two decimals:
1461 * @skipline format_set
1462 *
1463 * The third one will use a customized step, define new minimum and maximum
1464 * values and enable wrap, so when value reaches minimum it jumps to maximum,
1465 * or jumps to minimum after maximum value is reached. Format is set to display
1466 * a decimal:
1467 * @skipline elm_spinner_add
1468 * @until evas_object_show
1469 *
1470 * The fourth uses @c vertical style, so instead of left and right arrows,
1471 * top and bottom are displayed. Also the change interval is reduced, so
1472 * user can change value faster.
1473 * @skipline style
1474 * @skipline interval
1475 *
1476 * In the fifth the user won't be allowed to set value directly, i.e., will
1477 * be obligate change value only using arrows:
1478 * @skipline editable
1479 *
1480 * The sixth widget will receive a lot of special values, so
1481 * instead of reading numeric values, user will see labels for each one.
1482 * Also direct edition is disabled, otherwise users would see the numeric
1483 * value on edition mode. User will be able to select a month in this widget:
1484 * @skipline elm_spinner_add
1485 * @until evas_object_show
1486 *
1487 * Finally the last widget will exemplify how to listen to widget's signals,
1488 * <tt> changed </tt> and <tt> delay,changed </tt>. First we need to
1489 * implement callback functions that will simply print spinner's value:
1490 * @dontinclude spinner_example.c
1491 * @skip static
1492 * @skip }
1493 * @skipline static
1494 * @until }
1495 * @until }
1496 *
1497 * The first callback function should be called everytime value changes,
1498 * the second one only after user stops to increment or decrement. Try
1499 * to keep arrows pressed and check the difference.
1500 * @skip smart_callback
1501 * @skipline smart_callback
1502 * @skipline smart_callback
1503 *
1504 * See the full @ref spinner_example.c "example", whose window should
1505 * look like this picture:
1506 *
1507 * @image html screenshots/spinner_example.png
1508 * @image latex screenshots/spinner_example.eps width=\textwidth
1509 *
1510 * See the full @ref spinner_example.c "source code" for this example.
1511 *
1512 * @example spinner_example.c
1513 */
1514
1515/**
1516 * @page slider_example Slider widget example
1517 *
1518 * This code places seven Elementary slider widgets on a window, each of
1519 * them exemplifying a part of the widget's API.
1520 *
1521 * The first of them is the default slider:
1522 * @dontinclude slider_example.c
1523 * @skipline elm_slider_add
1524 * @until evas_object_show
1525 *
1526 * As you see, the defaults for a slider are:
1527 * @li horizontal
1528 * @li no label
1529 * @li no values (on indicator or unit labels)
1530 *
1531 * Actually it's pretty useless this way. So let's learn how to improve it.
1532 *
1533 * If some decoration is required, a label can be set, and icon before and
1534 * after the bar as well. On the second slider will add a @c home icon
1535 * and a @c folder icon at @c end.
1536 * @skip elm_object_text_set
1537 * @until elm_object_part_content_set(sl, "end", ic)
1538 *
1539 * If the bar size need to be changed, it can be done with span set function,
1540 * that doesn't accounts other widget's parts size. Also the bar can starts
1541 * with a not default value (0.0), as we done on third slider:
1542 * @skipline value_set
1543 * @skipline span_size_set
1544 *
1545 * So far, users won't be able to see the slider value. If it's required,
1546 * it can be displayed in two different areas, units label or above
1547 * the indicator.
1548 *
1549 * Let's place a units label on our widget, and also let's set minimum and
1550 * maximum value (uses 0.0 and 1.0 by default):
1551 * @skipline unit_format_set
1552 * @skipline min_max_set
1553 *
1554 * If above the indicator is the place to display the value, just set it.
1555 * Also, is possible to invert a bar, as you can see:
1556 * @skipline indicator_format_set
1557 * @skipline inverted_set
1558 *
1559 * But if you require to use a function a bit more customized to show the value,
1560 * is possible to registry a callback function that will be called
1561 * to display unit or indicator label. Only the value will be passed to this
1562 * function, that should return a string.
1563 * In this case, a function to free this string will be required.
1564 *
1565 * Let's exemplify with indicator label on our sixth slider:
1566 * @dontinclude slider_example.c
1567 * @skip static
1568 * @skip }
1569 * @skip static
1570 * @skip }
1571 * @skip static
1572 * @skip }
1573 * @skipline static
1574 * @until }
1575 * @until }
1576 *
1577 * Setting callback functions:
1578 * @skipline indicator_format_function_set
1579 * @skipline _indicator_free
1580 *
1581 * Also, a slider can be displayed vertically:
1582 * @dontinclude slider_example.c
1583 * @skipline elm_slider_horizontal_set
1584 *
1585 * Finally the last widget will exemplify how to listen to widget's signals,
1586 * <tt> changed </tt> and <tt> delay,changed </tt>. First we need to
1587 * implement callback functions that will simply print slider's value:
1588 * @dontinclude slider_example.c
1589 * @skip static
1590 * @skip }
1591 * @skipline static
1592 * @until }
1593 * @until }
1594 *
1595 * The first callback function should be called everytime value changes,
1596 * the second one only after user stops to increment or decrement. Try
1597 * to keep arrows pressed and check the difference.
1598 * @skip smart_callback
1599 * @skipline smart_callback
1600 * @skipline smart_callback
1601 *
1602 * See the full @ref slider_example.c "example", whose window should
1603 * look like this picture:
1604 *
1605 * @image html screenshots/slider_example.png
1606 * @image latex screenshots/slider_example.eps width=\textwidth
1607 *
1608 * See the full @ref slider_example.c "source code" for this example.
1609 *
1610 * @example slider_example.c
1611 */
1612
1613/**
1614 * @page panes_example Panes widget example
1615 *
1616 * This code places two Elementary panes widgets on a window, one of them
1617 * displayed vertically and the other horizontally, to exemplify
1618 * a part of the widget's API. Also, all the signals emitted by this
1619 * widget will be covered.
1620 *
1621 * Let's start adding a panes to our window:
1622 * @dontinclude panes_example.c
1623 * @skipline elm_panes_add
1624 * @until evas_object_show
1625 *
1626 * Now we will set a content (a simple button) to the left side of our
1627 * panes widget:
1628 * @skipline elm_button_add
1629 * @until content_left_set
1630 *
1631 * The content of the right side will be something a bit more elaborated, we'll
1632 * place another panes, displayed vertically (it's displayed horizontally
1633 * by default):
1634 * @skipline elm_panes_add
1635 * @until content_right_set
1636 *
1637 * When populating a panes displayed vertically, remember that left content
1638 * will be placed at top, and right content will place at bottom. Next
1639 * we will add two buttons to exemplify that:
1640 * @skipline elm_button_add
1641 * @until content_right_set
1642 *
1643 * Panes widgets emits 4 different signals, depending on users interaction
1644 * with the draggable bar. We'll add a callback function for each of them.
1645 *
1646 * <tt> "clicked" signal </tt>:
1647 *
1648 * Callback function that just print "Clicked" to stdin:
1649 * @dontinclude panes_example.c
1650 * @skip static void
1651 * @skip }
1652 * @skip static void
1653 * @skip }
1654 * @skip static void
1655 * @skip }
1656 * @skipline static void
1657 * @until }
1658 *
1659 * Also, add callback function to the panes:
1660 * @skipline "clicked"
1661 *
1662 * <tt> "press" signal </tt>:
1663 *
1664 * Callback function that just print "Pressed" to stdin:
1665 * @dontinclude panes_example.c
1666 * @skip static void
1667 * @skip }
1668 * @skipline static void
1669 * @until }
1670 *
1671 * Also, add callback function to the panes:
1672 * @skipline "press"
1673 *
1674 * Now, let's try to make our callback functions a bit more useful:
1675 *
1676 * <tt> "unpress" signal </tt>:
1677 *
1678 * Suppose we want to know the size proportion of left content after
1679 * user drags the bar. We need to listen for @c unpress signal, and
1680 * get this size from our panes widget. It's done on the following
1681 * function:
1682 * @dontinclude panes_example.c
1683 * @skip static void
1684 * @skip }
1685 * @skip static void
1686 * @skip }
1687 * @skipline static void
1688 * @until }
1689 *
1690 * Adding the callback function to the panes:
1691 * @skipline "unpress"
1692
1693 * <tt> "clicked,double" signal </tt>:
1694 *
1695 * Now, a interesting feature that could be addded to panes widget.
1696 * Hide a content when user double click the draggable bar. It's done
1697 * using a variable to store size and content left size getter and setter
1698 * on the following function:
1699 * @dontinclude panes_example.c
1700 * @skipline static double
1701 * @skip static void
1702 * @skip }
1703 * @skip static void
1704 * @skip }
1705 * @skip static void
1706 * @skip }
1707 * @skipline static void
1708 * @until }
1709 * @until }
1710 * @until }
1711 *
1712 * Adding the callback function to the panes:
1713 * @skipline "clicked,double"
1714 * @until panes);
1715 *
1716 * See the full @ref panes_example.c "example", whose window should
1717 * look like this picture:
1718 *
1719 * @image html screenshots/panes_example.png
1720 * @image latex screenshots/panes_example.eps width=\textwidth
1721 *
1722 * @example panes_example.c
1723 */
1724
1725/**
1726 * @page clock_example Clock widget example
1727 *
1728 * This code places five Elementary clock widgets on a window, each of
1729 * them exemplifying a part of the widget's API.
1730 *
1731 * The first of them is the pristine clock:
1732 * @dontinclude clock_example.c
1733 * @skip pristine
1734 * @until evas_object_show
1735 * As you see, the defaults for a clock are:
1736 * - military time
1737 * - no seconds shown
1738 *
1739 * For am/pm time, see the second clock:
1740 * @dontinclude clock_example.c
1741 * @skip am/pm
1742 * @until evas_object_show
1743 *
1744 * The third one will show the seconds digits, which will flip in
1745 * synchrony with system time. Note, besides, that the time itself is
1746 * @b different from the system's -- it was customly set with
1747 * elm_clock_time_set():
1748 * @dontinclude clock_example.c
1749 * @skip with seconds
1750 * @until evas_object_show
1751 *
1752 * In both fourth and fifth ones, we turn on the <b>edition
1753 * mode</b>. See how you can change each of the sheets on it, and be
1754 * sure to try holding the mouse pressed over one of the sheet
1755 * arrows. The forth one also starts with a custom time set:
1756 * @dontinclude clock_example.c
1757 * @skip in edition
1758 * @until evas_object_show
1759 *
1760 * The fifth, besides editable, has only the time @b units editable,
1761 * for hours, minutes and seconds. This exemplifies
1762 * elm_clock_edit_mode_set():
1763 * @dontinclude clock_example.c
1764 * @skip but only
1765 * @until evas_object_show
1766 *
1767 * See the full @ref clock_example.c "example", whose window should
1768 * look like this picture:
1769 *
1770 * @image html screenshots/clock_example.png
1771 * @image latex screenshots/clock_example.eps width=\textwidth
1772 *
1773 * See the full @ref clock_example_c "source code" for this example.
1774 *
1775 */
1776
1777/**
1778 * @page datetime_example Datetime widget example
1779 *
1780 * This code places three Elementary Datetime widgets on a window, each of
1781 * them exemplifying the widget's different usage.
1782 *
1783 * The first of them is <b>"only Date display"</b>:
1784 * @dontinclude datetime_example.c
1785 * @skip only DATE
1786 * @until evas_object_show
1787 *
1788 * For <b>"only Time display"</b>, see the second datetime:
1789 * @dontinclude datetime_example.c
1790 * @skip only TIME
1791 * @until evas_object_show
1792 *
1793 * The third one will display datetime shows both <b>Date and Time</b>, corresponding format will be
1794 * taken from system @b locale. Note, besides, that the strings are different
1795 * for different language settings.
1796 *
1797 * <b>Datetime format</b> can be programmatically set by using
1798 * elm_datetime_format_set():
1799 * @dontinclude datetime_example.c
1800 * @skip DATE and TIME
1801 * @until evas_object_show
1802 * The default format of any locale consists:
1803 * - Year Field
1804 * - Month Field
1805 * - Date Field
1806 * - Hour Field(12hr/24hr format)
1807 * - Minute Field
1808 * - AM/PM (if exists).
1809 *
1810 * This is how the example program's window looks like with the datetime widget
1811 * showing only date, only time and both date & time:
1812 *
1813 * @image html screenshots/datetime_example.png
1814 * @image latex screenshots/datetime_example.eps width=\textwidth
1815 *
1816 * See the full @ref datetime_example_c "source code" for
1817 * this example.
1818 *
1819 */
1820
1821/**
1822 * @page dayselector_example Dayselector widget example
1823 *
1824 * This code places two Elementary dayselector widgets on a window, each of
1825 * them exemplifying the different widget styles.
1826 *
1827 * The first of them is the dayselector in default style:
1828 * @dontinclude dayselector_example.c
1829 * @skip weekdays starting from Sunday
1830 * @until evas_object_show
1831 *
1832 * As you see, the default style displays the weekdays starting from Sunday.
1833 *
1834 * One can select/unselect a day just by clicking on the day object.
1835 * The selection toggles once it is being pressed.
1836 *
1837 *
1838 * For showing weekdays starting from Monday, see the second dayselector:
1839 * @dontinclude dayselector_example.c
1840 * @skip weekdays starting from Monday
1841 * @until evas_object_show
1842 *
1843 *
1844 * The following code exemplifies the selection APIs of Dayselector:
1845 * @dontinclude dayselector_example.c
1846 * @skip Callback function
1847 * @until End of clicked callback
1848 *
1849 *
1850 * See the full @ref dayselector_example.c "example", whose window should
1851 * look like this picture:
1852 *
1853 * @image html screenshots/dayselector_example.png
1854 * @image latex screenshots/dayselector_example.eps width=\textwidth
1855 *
1856 * See the full @ref dayselector_example_c "source code" for this example.
1857 *
1858 */
1859
1860/**
1861 * @page mapbuf_example Mapbuf Widget Example
1862 *
1863 * This code places an Elementary mapbuf widget on a window,
1864 * to exemplify part of the widget's API.
1865 *
1866 * First we'll add an window with a background and a vertical box to
1867 * pack our interface elements:
1868 * @dontinclude mapbuf_example.c
1869 * @skipline win_add
1870 * @until show(bx)
1871 *
1872 * Next we'll simply add the mapbuf widget to the box:
1873 * @skipline mapbuf_add
1874 * @until pack_end
1875 *
1876 * But mapbuf is a container widget, it won't do anything alone. So let's
1877 * create a table full of icons. For that we'll loop to fill each line of each
1878 * column. See @ref tutorial_table_01 "tutorial_table_01"
1879 * if you don't know how to use tables:
1880 * @skipline table_add
1881 * @until }
1882 * @until }
1883 *
1884 * Finally, setting mapbuf content:
1885 * @skipline content_set
1886 * @skipline show
1887 *
1888 * Also, would be good a horizontal box with some controls to change mapbuf
1889 * behavior:
1890 * @skipline box_add
1891 * @until show
1892 *
1893 * By default map is disabled. So just setting content isn't enough.
1894 * Alpha and smooth settings will be applied when map is enabled.
1895 * So we'll add a check for that. Everytime the map properties
1896 * are changed, map will need to be enabled again. So if you
1897 * want to play a bit with our example, remember to always enable
1898 * map again after concluding your changes.
1899 * @skipline check_add
1900 * @until show
1901 *
1902 * We have added a callback function to this check, so it will enable
1903 * or disable map:
1904 * @dontinclude mapbuf_example.c
1905 * @skip static
1906 * @skip }
1907 * @skipline static
1908 * @until }
1909 *
1910 * Let's add check boxes for alpha blending and smooth rendering:
1911 * @skipline check_add
1912 * @until show
1913 * @until show
1914 *
1915 * By default, mapbuf would enable alpha blending and smooth rendering,
1916 * so we need to check boxes to be consistent with its behavior.
1917 *
1918 * Callback functions look like the one added to the check. This way we
1919 * could enable or disable the both properties:
1920 * @dontinclude mapbuf_example.c
1921 * @skip static
1922 * @skip }
1923 * @skip static
1924 * @skip }
1925 * @skipline static
1926 * @until }
1927 * @until }
1928 *
1929 * You'll see that disabling alpha blending will set a black rectangle below
1930 * the icons. That's the reason you only should enable that when you're sure
1931 * the mapbuf content is 100% solid.
1932 *
1933 * See @ref mapbuf_example.c "mapbuf_example.c", whose window should
1934 * look like this picture:
1935 *
1936 * @image html screenshots/mapbuf_example.png
1937 * @image latex screenshots/mapbuf_example.eps width=\textwidth
1938 *
1939 * @example mapbuf_example.c
1940 */
1941
1942/**
1943 * @page map_example_01 Map Example - Creation and Zoom
1944 *
1945 * This code places an Elementary map widget on a window,
1946 * to exemplify part of the widget's API.
1947 *
1948 * Let's start adding a map to our window:
1949 * @dontinclude map_example_01.c
1950 * @skipline elm_map_add
1951 * @until evas_object_show
1952 *
1953 * It's enough to display a world map inside our window. But usually you'll
1954 * need to let user interact with the map. We need to place some buttons,
1955 * so the user could control the map. It's done on the following code.
1956 * If you don't know about boxes, or buttons, check their examples,
1957 * @ref box_example_01 "Box Example 1" and
1958 * @ref button_example_01 "Button Example 1".
1959 * @skipline elm_box_add
1960 * @until _bt_zoom_fill
1961 *
1962 * We are adding callback functions that will be called when the user clicks
1963 * over these buttons. Let's study such functions, starting from the function
1964 * that will zoom in the map:
1965 * @dontinclude map_example_01.c
1966 * @skipline static void
1967 * @until }
1968 *
1969 * First thing done is assure zoom mode is set to manual. It's the default
1970 * mode, but the other buttons will change this, so before setting a new
1971 * zoom value, we need to change the zoom mode.
1972 *
1973 * Then, we get the current zoom value, increment that, and set the new
1974 * value to the map. If it's bigger than max zoom value allowed, it will
1975 * remain on the maximum allowed, nothing bad will happen. This way we
1976 * don't need to check first if it won't be bigger than max.
1977 *
1978 * Zoom out function is basically the same thing, but zoom will be decremented
1979 * instead of incremented:
1980 * @skipline static void
1981 * @until }
1982 *
1983 * The "X" button, when pressed, will call a function that will
1984 * zoom the map until it fits
1985 * inside the scroll frame with no pixels outside this area:
1986 * @skipline static void
1987 * @until }
1988 *
1989 * And the "#" button, will call a function that will zoom until map fills
1990 * scroll, ensuring no pixels are left unfilled:
1991 * @skipline static void
1992 * @until }
1993 *
1994 * But we can also set map to show something different from default
1995 * world map, changing the zoom level and region shown. Let's pick a
1996 * wonderful city coordinates, one placed at <tt> 43 20 S, 22 90 W </tt>.
1997 * Since map uses double variables to represent latitude and longitude,
1998 * to represent north or east, we should represent it as positive values,
1999 * and south or west as negative. Also, the value will be represented as
2000 * degree.min. So, for example, our longitude <tt> 43 20 S </tt> will
2001 * be represented
2002 * by the value <tt> -43.20 </tt>. A zoom set to @c 12 should be enough
2003 * to show a city.
2004 * @skipline region_show
2005 * @until zoom_set
2006 *
2007 * See @ref map_example_01.c "map_example_01.c" for full source,
2008 * whose window should
2009 * look like this picture:
2010 *
2011 * @image html screenshots/map_example_01.png
2012 * @image latex screenshots/map_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
2013 *
2014 * @example map_example_01.c
2015 */
2016
2017/**
2018 * @page map_example_02 Map Example - Overlay Usage
2019 *
2020 * This code places an Elementary map widget on a window,
2021 * to exemplify part of the widget's API, related to overlays.
2022 *
2023 * We'll start this example in the same way as
2024 * @ref map_example_01 "Map Example 1". Adding a map with buttons to control
2025 * zoom, so if you didn't read it yet, just do it now.
2026 * @dontinclude map_example_02.c
2027 * @skipline elm_map_add
2028 * @until zoom_fill
2029 *
2030 * Overlays can be placed over the map to represent anything we want. Let's
2031 * say we want to represent some countries and cities with overlays.
2032 *
2033 * Before we create city or country overlays, let's create class overlays.
2034 *
2035 * @skipline elm_map_overlay_class_add
2036 * @until elm_map_overlay_icon_set
2037 * These lines create a class overlay which represents cities.
2038 * This class overlay will be used for grouping city overlays.
2039 * Later city overlays in the same class are appended to this class overlay.
2040 * if city overlays are near each other, they will be grouped.
2041 *
2042 * We can set the icon for the class so that the icon will be displayed
2043 * when city overlays are grouped.
2044 * We can set the zoom required to display the overlays that belongs
2045 * to this class, so if the zoom is less than this value, nothing
2046 * will be shown.
2047 *
2048 * Country class can be created in the same way.
2049 * @skipline elm_map_overlay_class_add
2050 * @until elm_map_overlay_icon_set
2051 *
2052 * Next we'll create some overlays representing cities and countries.
2053 * We set the data for the overlay so that can be used later when
2054 * clicked callback is called.
2055 * We'll append them into city class to be grouped.
2056 * We'll append them in a list, to close up them later.
2057 * To create a default overlay, we need to pass the coordinates.
2058 * @skipline elm_map_overlay_add
2059 * @until eina_list_append
2060 *
2061 * We subscribe a smart callback "overlay,clicked" to create bubble on
2062 * the clicked overlay.
2063 * @dontinclude map_example_02.c
2064 * @skipline "overlay,clicked"
2065 *
2066 * Finally, on our @c main function, we ask the map to show all the overlays
2067 * with the biggest zoom possible, passing the list of overlays added.
2068 * @skipline elm_map_overlays_show
2069 *
2070 * We have created a specific structure for this example to store the name
2071 * of the place and a path to a image file to represent it.
2072 * @dontinclude map_example_02.c
2073 * @skipline typedef
2074 * @until Overlay_Data;
2075 *
2076 * We'll create instances for each place:
2077 * @skipline argentina
2078 * @until sky_03
2079 *
2080 * To return an icon, all we need to do is to add a elm_icon and return it:
2081 * @dontinclude map_example_02.c
2082 * @skipline _icon_get(
2083 * @until }
2084 *
2085 * For the content, let's return something more elaborate. We will return
2086 * a box with an image representing the place, and the name of this place:
2087 * @skipline _box_get(
2088 * @until }
2089 *
2090 * See @ref map_example_02.c "map_example_02.c" for full source,
2091 * whose window should
2092 * look like this picture:
2093 *
2094 * @image html screenshots/map_example_02.png
2095 * @image latex screenshots/map_example_02.eps width=\textwidth
2096 *
2097 * @example map_example_02.c
2098 */
2099
2100/**
2101 * @page map_example_03 Map Example - Route and Name Usage
2102 *
2103 * This code places an Elementary map widget on a window,
2104 * to exemplify part of the widget's API, related routes and names.
2105 *
2106 * In this example, we will suppose we need to set a route for the user
2107 * from his current point (a gps could provide us this information)
2108 * to somewhere else. So we would have coordinates of this
2109 * start point, and would like that he enters the address of his
2110 * destination in a entry, and we'll trace a route on the map.
2111 *
2112 * We'll start this example in the same way
2113 * @ref map_example_01 "Map Example 1". Adding a map with buttons to control
2114 * zoom, so if you didn't read it yet, just do it now. Actually there is
2115 * a change, that we're aligning buttons to the top, since we wan't a
2116 * vertical control box this time.
2117 * @dontinclude map_example_03.c
2118 * @skipline elm_map_add
2119 * @until zoom_fill
2120 * @until align_set
2121 *
2122 * Next we set the box to be vertical and change it's size, weight
2123 * and alignment, so it will occupy the top of the window, from left
2124 * to right:
2125 * @skipline horizontal_set
2126 * @until align_set
2127 *
2128 * We'll add an entry with a preliminar address, that I know will
2129 * find a coordinate, to examplify names work. But you can try
2130 * lots of addresses. From city or country names to pubs, or whatever
2131 * you want. To try is enough to run the example, type the address and
2132 * press "Route" button. This button will call a function that will
2133 * get the typed address and find the route.
2134 * @skipline entry_add
2135 * @until align_set
2136 * @until align_set
2137 *
2138 * The button pass an structure
2139 * instance we make for this example, with all the fields we'll need.
2140 * @dontinclude map_example_03.c
2141 * @skipline _Example_Data
2142 * @until example_data;
2143 *
2144 * Let's initialize it's fields:
2145 * @skipline example_data.map
2146 * @until example_data.start_lat
2147 *
2148 * @c map and @c entry are our elementary objects, @c route is set to @c NULL,
2149 * since we don't have one yet, and the coordinates of the start point is set
2150 * (longitude and latitude).
2151 *
2152 * Also, let's show this start point at the center of the map, and set a zoom
2153 * nice enough to close it:
2154 * @skipline region_show
2155 * @until zoom_set
2156 *
2157 * These lines were already explained on @ref map_example_02 "Map Example 2".
2158 *
2159 * Now we'll see the "Route" button callback function:
2160 * @dontinclude map_example_03.c
2161 * @skip static void
2162 * @skip }
2163 * @skipline static void
2164 * @until }
2165 *
2166 * First we get the address string from our entry. Then we use @c name
2167 * conversion
2168 * util functions, so we could get coordinates for this address. These
2169 * functions return an #Elm_Map_Name handle for us.
2170 * Function elm_map_name_geo_request() will do this job for us,
2171 * but it's an asynchronous function, since it requires this
2172 * information from the server.
2173 *
2174 * That's the reason we need to wait for
2175 * <tt> "name,loaded" </tt> signal. We add a callback function for this:
2176 * @dontinclude map_example_03.c
2177 * @skipline static void
2178 * @until }
2179 *
2180 * This function will check if a previous route was traced, and if it was,
2181 * it will remove it. Next we'll get destination coordinates from our
2182 * @c name, and use them to add a new route.
2183 *
2184 * To trace a route we need to know how the user will go through the path.
2185 * Let's suppose he'll be walking, but doesn't like to walk, so we
2186 * need to choose the shortest path instead of the route that would
2187 * made him spend less time. Coordinates of the point from where he will
2188 * start and of the destination point need to be passed as well.
2189 *
2190 * Finally we'll set a color different from solid red (default), to show
2191 * our route. We set it green.
2192 *
2193 * See @ref map_example_03.c "map_example_03.c" for full source,
2194 * whose window should
2195 * look like this picture:
2196 *
2197 * @image html screenshots/map_example_03.png
2198 * @image latex screenshots/map_example_03.eps width=\textwidth
2199 *
2200 * @example map_example_03.c
2201 */
2202
2203/**
2204 * @page diskselector_example_01 Diskselector widget example
2205 *
2206 * This code places 4 Elementary diskselector widgets on a window, each of
2207 * them exemplifying a part of the widget's API.
2208 *
2209 * All of them will have weekdays as items, since we won't focus
2210 * on items management on this example. For an example about this subject,
2211 * check @ref diskselector_example_02.
2212 *
2213 * The first of them is a default diskselector.
2214 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_01.c
2215 * @skipline lbl
2216 * @until }
2217 * @skipline elm_diskselector_add
2218 * @until evas_object_show
2219 *
2220 * We are just adding the diskselector, so as you can see, defaults for it are:
2221 * @li Only 3 items visible each time.
2222 * @li Only 3 characters are displayed for labels on side positions.
2223 * @li The first added item remains centeres, i.e., it's the selected item.
2224 *
2225 * To add items, we are just appending it on a loop, using function
2226 * elm_diskselector_item_append(), that will be better explained on
2227 * items management example.
2228 *
2229 * For a circular diskselector, check the second widget. A circular
2230 * diskselector will display first item after last, and last previous to
2231 * the first one. So, as you can see, @b Sa will appears on left side
2232 * of selected @b Sunday. This property is set with
2233 * elm_diskselector_round_enabled_set().
2234 *
2235 * Also, we decide to display only 2 character for side labels, instead of 3.
2236 * For this we call elm_diskselector_side_text_max_length_set(). As result,
2237 * we'll see @b Mo displayed instead of @b Mon, when @b Monday is on a
2238 * side position.
2239 *
2240 * @skipline elm_diskselector_add
2241 * @until evas_object_show
2242 *
2243 * But so far, we are only displaying 3 items at once. If more are wanted,
2244 * is enough to call elm_diskselector_display_item_num_set(), as you can
2245 * see here:
2246 * @skipline elm_diskselector_add
2247 * @until elm_diskselector_display_item_num_set
2248 *
2249 * @note You can't set less than 3 items to be displayed.
2250 *
2251 * You can get the number of items in the diskselector by calling
2252 * elm_diskselector_display_item_num_get(), as you can see here:
2253 * @skipline elm_diskselector_display_item_num_get
2254 *
2255 * Finally, if a bounce effect is required, or you would like to see
2256 * scrollbars, it is possible. But, for default theme, diskselector
2257 * scrollbars will be invisible anyway.
2258 * @skipline elm_diskselector_add
2259 * @until evas_object_show
2260 *
2261 * See the full @ref diskselector_example_01.c "diskselector_example_01.c"
2262 * code, whose window should look like this picture:
2263 *
2264 * @image html screenshots/diskselector_example_01.png
2265 * @image latex screenshots/diskselector_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
2266 *
2267 * @example diskselector_example_01.c
2268 */
2269
2270/**
2271 * @page diskselector_example_02 Diskselector - Items management
2272 *
2273 * This code places an Elementary diskselector widgets on a window,
2274 * along with some buttons trigerring actions on it (though its API).
2275 * It covers most of diskselector item functions.
2276 *
2277 * On our @c main function, we are adding a default diskselector with
2278 * 3 items. We are only setting their labels (second parameter of function
2279 * elm_diskselector_item_append):
2280 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2281 * @skipline elm_diskselector_add
2282 * @until Item 2
2283 *
2284 * Next we are adding lots of buttons, each one for a callback function
2285 * that will realize a task covering part of diskselector items API.
2286 * Lets check the first one:
2287 * @skipline elm_button_add
2288 * @until evas_object_show
2289 *
2290 * We are labeling the button with a task description with
2291 * elm_object_text_set() and setting a callback
2292 * function evas_object_smart_callback_add().
2293 * Each callback function will have the signature:
2294 * <tt> static void _task_cb(void *data, Evas_Object *obj,
2295 * void *event_info)</tt> with the function name varying for each task.
2296 *
2297 * Now let's cover all of them.
2298 *
2299 * <b> Appending an item: </b>
2300 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2301 * @skipline _add_cb
2302 * @until }
2303 *
2304 * All items are included on diskselector after last one. You @b can't
2305 * prepend items.
2306 *
2307 * The first parameter of elm_diskselector_item_append() is the diskselector
2308 * object, that we are receiving as data on our callback function.
2309 * The second one is a label, the string that will be placed in the center
2310 * of our item. As we don't wan't icons or callback functions, we can
2311 * send NULL as third, fourth and fifth parameters.
2312 *
2313 * <b> Appending an item with icon: </b>
2314 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2315 * @skipline _add_ic_cb
2316 * @until }
2317 *
2318 * If an icon is required, you can pass it as third parameter on our
2319 * elm_diskselector_item_append() function. It will be place on the
2320 * left side of item's label, that will be shifted to right a bit.
2321 *
2322 * For more details about how to create icons, look for elm_icon examples.
2323 *
2324 * <b> Appending an item with callback function for selected: </b>
2325 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2326 * @skipline _sel_cb
2327 * @until }
2328 * @until }
2329 *
2330 * To set a callback function that will be called every time an item is
2331 * selected, i.e., everytime the diskselector stops with this item in
2332 * center position, just pass the function as fourth parameter.
2333 *
2334 * <b> Appending an item with callback function for selected with data: </b>
2335 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2336 * @skipline _sel_data_cb
2337 * @until }
2338 * @until }
2339 * @until }
2340 * @until }
2341 *
2342 * If the callback function request an extra data, it can be attached to our
2343 * item passing a pointer for data as fifth parameter.
2344 * Our function _sel_data_cb will receive it as <tt> void *data </tt>.
2345 *
2346 * If you want to free this data, or handle that the way you need when the
2347 * item is deleted, set a callback function for that, with
2348 * elm_object_item_del_cb_set().
2349 *
2350 * As you can see we check if @c it is not @c NULL after appending it.
2351 * If an error happens, we won't try to set a function for it.
2352 *
2353 * <b> Deleting an item: </b>
2354 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2355 * @skipline _del_cb(void
2356 * @until }
2357 *
2358 * To delete an item we simple need to call elm_object_item_del() with
2359 * a pointer for such item.
2360 *
2361 * If you need, you can get selected item with
2362 * elm_diskselector_selected_item_get(), that will return a pointer for it.
2363 *
2364 * <b> Unselecting an item: </b>
2365 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2366 * @skipline _unselect_cb
2367 * @until }
2368 *
2369 * To select an item, you should call elm_diskselector_item_selected_set()
2370 * passing @c EINA_TRUE, and to unselect it, @c EINA_FALSE.
2371 *
2372 * If you unselect the selected item, diskselector will automatically select
2373 * the first item.
2374 *
2375 * <b> Printing all items: </b>
2376 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2377 * @skipline _print_cb
2378 * @until }
2379 *
2380 * <b> Clearing the diskselector: </b>
2381 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2382 * @skipline _clear_cb
2383 * @until }
2384 *
2385 * <b> Selecting the first item: </b>
2386 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2387 * @skipline _select_first_cb
2388 * @until }
2389 *
2390 * <b> Selecting the last item: </b>
2391 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2392 * @skipline _select_last_cb
2393 * @until }
2394 *
2395 * <b> Selecting the next item: </b>
2396 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2397 * @skipline _select_next_cb
2398 * @until }
2399 *
2400 * <b> Selecting the previous item: </b>
2401 * @dontinclude diskselector_example_02.c
2402 * @skipline _select_prev_cb
2403 * @until }
2404 *
2405 * See the full @ref diskselector_example_02.c "diskselector_example_02.c"
2406 * code, whose window should look like this picture:
2407 *
2408 * @image html screenshots/diskselector_example_02.png
2409 * @image latex screenshots/diskselector_example_02.eps width=\textwidth
2410 *
2411 * @example diskselector_example_02.c
2412 */
2413
2414/**
2415 * @page list_example_01 List widget example
2416 *
2417 * This code places a single Elementary list widgets on a window, just
2418 * to exemplify the more simple and common use case: a list will be created
2419 * and populated with a few items.
2420 *
2421 * To keep it simple, we won't show how to customize the list, for this check
2422 * @ref list_example_02. Also, we won't focus
2423 * on items management on this example. For an example about this subject,
2424 * check @ref list_example_03.
2425 *
2426 * To add a list widget.
2427 * @dontinclude list_example_01.c
2428 * @skipline elm_list_add
2429 *
2430 * We are just adding the list, so as you can see, defaults for it are:
2431 * @li Items are displayed vertically.
2432 * @li Only one item can be selected.
2433 * @li The list doesn't bounce.
2434 *
2435 * To add items, we are just appending it on a loop, using function
2436 * elm_list_item_append(), that will be better explained on
2437 * items management example.
2438 * @dontinclude list_example_01.c
2439 * @skipline lbl[]
2440 * @until };
2441 * @skipline for
2442 * @skipline elm_list_item_append
2443 *
2444 * After we just want to show the list. But first we need to start the widget.
2445 * It was done this way to improve widget's performance. So, always remember
2446 * that:
2447 * @warning Call elm_list_go before showing the object
2448 * @skipline elm_list_go
2449 * @skipline show
2450 *
2451 * See the full @ref list_example_01.c "list_example_01.c"
2452 * code, whose window should look like this picture:
2453 *
2454 * @image html screenshots/list_example_01.png
2455 * @image latex screenshots/list_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
2456 *
2457 * @example list_example_01.c
2458 */
2459
2460/**
2461 * @page list_example_02 List widget example
2462 *
2463 * This code places a single Elementary list widgets on a window,
2464 * exemplifying a part of the widget's API.
2465 *
2466 * First, we will just create a simple list, as done on @ref list_example_01 :
2467 * @dontinclude list_example_02.c
2468 * @skipline lbl
2469 * @until }
2470 * @skipline elm_list_add
2471 * @until elm_list_item_append
2472 *
2473 * Now, let's customize this list a bit. First we will display items
2474 * horizontally:
2475 * @skipline horizontal_set
2476 *
2477 * Then we will choose another list mode. There are four of them, and
2478 * the default #Elm_List_Mode is #ELM_LIST_SCROLL. Let's set compress mode:
2479 * @skipline mode_set
2480 *
2481 * To enable multiple items selection, we need to enable it, since only one
2482 * selected item is allowed by default:
2483 * @skipline elm_list_multi_select_set
2484 *
2485 * We are not adding items with callback functions here,
2486 * since we'll explain it better on @ref list_example_03. But if the callback
2487 * need to be called everytime user clicks an item, even if already selected,
2488 * it's required to enable this behavior:
2489 * @skipline elm_list_select_mode_set
2490 *
2491 * Finally, if a bounce effect is required, or you would like to see
2492 * scrollbars, it is possible. But, for default theme, list
2493 * scrollbars will be invisible anyway.
2494 * @skipline bounce_set
2495 * @until SCROLLER_POLICY_ON
2496 *
2497 * See the full @ref list_example_02.c "list_example_02.c"
2498 * code, whose window should look like this picture:
2499 *
2500 * @image html screenshots/list_example_02.png
2501 * @image latex screenshots/list_example_02.eps width=\textwidth
2502 *
2503 * @example list_example_02.c
2504 */
2505
2506/**
2507 * @page list_example_03 List - Items management
2508 *
2509 * This code places an Elementary list widgets on a window,
2510 * along with some buttons trigerring actions on it (though its API).
2511 * It covers most of elm_list_item functions.
2512 *
2513 * On our @c main function, we are adding a default list with
2514 * 3 items. We are only setting their labels (second parameter of function
2515 * elm_list_item_append):
2516 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2517 * @skipline elm_list_add
2518 * @until Item 2
2519 *
2520 * Next we are adding lots of buttons, each one for a callback function
2521 * that will realize a task covering part of list items API.
2522 * Lets check the first one:
2523 * @skipline elm_button_add
2524 * @until evas_object_show
2525 *
2526 * We are labeling the button with a task description with
2527 * elm_object_text_set() and setting a callback
2528 * function evas_object_smart_callback_add().
2529 * Each callback function will have the signature:
2530 * <tt> static void _task_cb(void *data, Evas_Object *obj,
2531 * void *event_info)</tt> with the function name varying for each task.
2532 *
2533 * Now let's cover all of them.
2534 *
2535 * <b> Prepending an item: </b>
2536 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2537 * @skipline _prepend_cb
2538 * @until }
2539 *
2540 * The item will be placed on the beginning of the list,
2541 * i.e. it will be the first one.
2542 *
2543 * The first parameter of elm_list_item_prepend() is the list
2544 * object, that we are receiving as data on our callback function.
2545 * The second one is a label, the string that will be placed in the center
2546 * of our item. As we don't wan't icons or callback functions, we can
2547 * send NULL as third, fourth, fifth and sixth parameters.
2548 *
2549 * <b> Appending an item: </b>
2550 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2551 * @skipline _add_cb
2552 * @until }
2553 *
2554 * Items included with append will be inserted inserted after the last one.
2555 *
2556 * <b> Appending an item with icon: </b>
2557 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2558 * @skipline _add_ic_cb
2559 * @until }
2560 *
2561 * If an icon is required, you can pass it as third parameter on our
2562 * elm_list_item_append() function. It will be place on the
2563 * left side of item's label. If an icon is wanted on the right side,
2564 * it should be passed as fourth parameter.
2565 *
2566 * For more details about how to create icons, look for elm_icon examples
2567 * @ref tutorial_icon.
2568 *
2569 * <b> Appending an item with callback function for selected: </b>
2570 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2571 * @skipline _sel_cb
2572 * @until }
2573 * @until }
2574 *
2575 * To set a callback function that will be called every time an item is
2576 * selected, i.e., everytime the list stops with this item in
2577 * center position, just pass the function as fifth parameter.
2578 *
2579 * <b> Appending an item with callback function for selected with data: </b>
2580 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2581 * @skipline _sel_data_cb
2582 * @until }
2583 * @until }
2584 * @until }
2585 * @until }
2586 *
2587 * If the callback function request an extra data, it can be attached to our
2588 * item passing a pointer for data as sixth parameter.
2589 * Our function _sel_data_cb will receive it as <tt> void *data </tt>.
2590 *
2591 * If you want to free this data, or handle that the way you need when the
2592 * item is deleted, set a callback function for that, with
2593 * elm_object_item_del_cb_set().
2594 *
2595 * As you can see we check if @c it is not @c NULL after appending it.
2596 * If an error happens, we won't try to set a function for it.
2597 *
2598 * <b> Deleting an item: </b>
2599 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2600 * @skipline _del_cb(
2601 * @until }
2602 *
2603 * To delete an item we simple need to call elm_object_item_del() with
2604 * a pointer for such item.
2605 *
2606 * If you need, you can get selected item with
2607 * elm_list_selected_item_get(), that will return a pointer for it.
2608 *
2609 * <b> Unselecting an item: </b>
2610 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2611 * @skipline _unselect_cb
2612 * @until }
2613 *
2614 * To select an item, you should call elm_list_item_selected_set()
2615 * passing @c EINA_TRUE, and to unselect it, @c EINA_FALSE.
2616 *
2617 * <b> Printing all items: </b>
2618 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2619 * @skipline _print_cb
2620 * @until }
2621 *
2622 * <b> Clearing the list: </b>
2623 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2624 * @skipline _clear_cb
2625 * @until }
2626 *
2627 * <b> Selecting the next item: </b>
2628 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2629 * @skipline _select_next_cb
2630 * @until }
2631 *
2632 * <b> Inserting after an item: </b>
2633 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2634 * @skipline _insert_after_cb
2635 * @until }
2636 *
2637 * <b> Selecting the previous item: </b>
2638 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2639 * @skipline _select_prev_cb
2640 * @until }
2641 *
2642 * <b> Inserting before an item: </b>
2643 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2644 * @skipline _insert_before_cb
2645 * @until }
2646 *
2647 * If a separator is required, just set an item as such:
2648 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2649 * @skipline _set_separator_cb
2650 * @until }
2651 *
2652 * Also an item can be disabled, and the user won't be allowed to (un)select it:
2653 * @dontinclude list_example_03.c
2654 * @skipline _disable_cb
2655 * @until }
2656 *
2657 * See the full @ref list_example_03.c "list_example_03.c"
2658 * code, whose window should look like this picture:
2659 *
2660 * @image html screenshots/list_example_03.png
2661 * @image latex screenshots/list_example_03.eps width=\textwidth
2662 *
2663 * @example list_example_03.c
2664 */
2665
2666/**
2667 * @page toolbar_example_01 Toolbar Example - Simple Items
2668 *
2669 * This code places an Elementary toolbar widget on a window,
2670 * to exemplify part of the widget's API.
2671 *
2672 * Let's start adding a button to our window, that will have its text
2673 * modified depending on which item is selected. It's used just to exemplify
2674 * how to change a window content from the toolbar.
2675 * @dontinclude toolbar_example_01.c
2676 * @skipline elm_button_add
2677 * @until evas_object_show
2678 *
2679 * Also, we'll need a toolbar widget, obviously:
2680 * @skipline elm_toolbar_add
2681 * @until evas_object_show
2682 *
2683 * When appending an item is possible to set an icon, label, and a callback
2684 * function that will receive passed data.
2685 * @skipline _item_append
2686 * @until Folder
2687 *
2688 * It's possible to disable items, so the user can't select then. We will
2689 * disable the third item:
2690 * @skipline _item_append
2691 * @until disable
2692 *
2693 * Our callbacks will just set button's label:
2694 * @dontinclude toolbar_example_01.c
2695 * @skip static
2696 * @skip }
2697 * @skipline static
2698 * @until }
2699 * @until }
2700 * @until }
2701 *
2702 * By default, toolbars would display items homogeneously, so item with
2703 * long labels, like the third, will make all of them occupy a lot of space.
2704 * To avoid that, we can disable it:
2705 * @dontinclude toolbar_example_01.c
2706 * @skipline homogeneous
2707 *
2708 * Another default behavior, is to add an menu item if we have more items
2709 * that would fit on toolbar size. To simply enable scroll, without menus,
2710 * it's required to change toolbar's shrink mode:
2711 * @dontinclude toolbar_example_01.c
2712 * @skipline shrink
2713 *
2714 * See @ref toolbar_example_01.c "toolbar_example_01.c", whose window should
2715 * look like this picture:
2716 *
2717 * @image html screenshots/toolbar_example_01.png
2718 * @image latex screenshots/toolbar_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
2719 *
2720 * @example toolbar_example_01.c
2721 */
2722
2723/**
2724 * @page toolbar_example_02 Toolbar Example - Items with States
2725 *
2726 * This code places an Elementary toolbar widget on a window,
2727 * to exemplify part of the widget's API.
2728 *
2729 * Toolbar widgets has support to items with states. Each state
2730 * can have it's own label, icon, and callback function.
2731 *
2732 * Let's start populating a toolbar with some regular items.
2733 * If you don't know how to do that, see
2734 * @ref toolbar_example_01 "Toolbar Example 1".
2735 * @dontinclude toolbar_example_02.c
2736 * @skipline elm_toolbar_add
2737 * @until Update
2738 *
2739 * The only difference here is that we set shrink mode to #ELM_TOOLBAR_SHRINK_HIDE,
2740 * that won't display items that doesn't fit to the window.
2741 *
2742 * Now, let's add an item with states. First, add the item just as any other.
2743 * @skipline elm_toolbar_item_append
2744 * @until _item_pressed
2745 *
2746 * After that states can be added to this item:
2747 * @skipline state_add
2748 * @until Full
2749 * @until _item_pressed
2750 *
2751 * The both states and the item are using the same callback function,
2752 * that will cycle between states and unselect the item. Unseleting
2753 * is required because it won't call the callback if an user clicks
2754 * over an item already selected:
2755 * @dontinclude toolbar_example_02.c
2756 * @skip static
2757 * @skip }
2758 * @skipline static
2759 * @until }
2760 *
2761 * On our example, some items are hidden
2762 * because we set the window to be small. But if an item should be displayed
2763 * anyway, is needed to set its priority to be higher than others.
2764 * Any positive value will be enough in our case. Let's force the item
2765 * with multiple states to be displayed.
2766 * @skipline priority
2767 *
2768 * See @ref toolbar_example_02.c "toolbar_example_02.c", whose window should
2769 * look like this picture:
2770 *
2771 * @image html screenshots/toolbar_example_02.png
2772 * @image latex screenshots/toolbar_example_02.eps width=\textwidth
2773 *
2774 * @example toolbar_example_02.c
2775 */
2776
2777/**
2778 * @page toolbar_example_03 Toolbar Example - Items with Menus
2779 *
2780 * Toolbar widgets have support to items with menus. This kind
2781 * of item will display a menu when selected by the user.
2782 *
2783 * Let's start populating a toolbar with some regular items, the same
2784 * way we started @ref toolbar_example_02 "Toolbar Example 2".
2785 * @dontinclude toolbar_example_03.c
2786 * @skipline elm_toolbar_add
2787 * @until Update
2788 *
2789 * The only difference is that we'll keep the default shrink mode, that
2790 * adds an item with a menu of hidden items.
2791 *
2792 * So, a important thing to do is to set a parent for toolbar menus, or they
2793 * will use the toolbar as parent, and its size will be restricted to that.
2794 * @skipline parent_set
2795 *
2796 * Not only items' menus will respect this parent, but also the own toolbar
2797 * menu, used to show hidden items.
2798 *
2799 * Next, let's add an item set to display a menu:
2800 * @skipline elm_toolbar_item_append
2801 * @until _menu_set
2802 *
2803 * Now, to add two options to this item, we can get the menu object and use
2804 * it as a regular elm_menu. See @ref tutorial_menu "Menu example" for more
2805 * about menu widget.
2806 * @skipline _menu_get
2807 * @until Full
2808 *
2809 * See @ref toolbar_example_03.c "toolbar_example_03.c", whose window should
2810 * look like this picture:
2811 *
2812 * @image html screenshots/toolbar_example_03.png
2813 * @image latex screenshots/toolbar_example_03.eps width=\textwidth
2814 *
2815 * @example toolbar_example_03.c
2816 */
2817
2818/**
2819 * @page segment_control_example Segment Control Example
2820 *
2821 * This code places an Elementary segment control widgets on a window,
2822 * to exemplify part of the widget's API.
2823 *
2824 * Let's start adding a segment control to our window:
2825 * @dontinclude segment_control_example.c
2826 * @skipline elm_segment_control_add
2827 * @until evas_object_show
2828 *
2829 * Now will add an item only with label:
2830 * @skipline item_add
2831 *
2832 * Really simple. To add an item with only an icon, the icon needs to be created
2833 * first, them added with this same function:
2834 * @skipline icon_add
2835 * @until item_add
2836 *
2837 * If an item with label and icon is required, it can be done as well. In this
2838 * case, instead of a label (or icon) centered, the item will display an icon
2839 * at left and the label at right:
2840 * @skipline icon_add
2841 * @until item_add
2842 *
2843 * But, if you need to add some items that can have or not a label, but
2844 * want that all of them looks the same way, with icon at left, just add
2845 * an empty string label. It's done on our example to illustrate that:
2846 * @skipline icon_add
2847 * @until item_add
2848 *
2849 * So far, all the item were added to the last position of the widget,
2850 * but if something different is required, it can be done using another
2851 * insertion function. Let's suppose we want to put an item just before
2852 * the last item:
2853 * @skipline count
2854 * @until insert_at
2855 *
2856 * There are two ways to delete items. Using the item handle, like:
2857 * @skipline insert_at
2858 * @until del
2859 *
2860 * Or using item's index:
2861 * @skipline insert_at
2862 * @until del_at
2863 *
2864 * To set properties of an item already added to the widget, you just need
2865 * to get the item and set icon or label, as the following code shows:
2866 * @skipline item_get
2867 * @until label_set
2868 *
2869 * Finally, it's possible to select an item from the code, and also get
2870 * the selected item. We will select the item at the center of the widget
2871 * and print its position.
2872 * @skipline count_get
2873 * @until printf
2874 *
2875 * See the full @ref segment_control_example.c "example", whose window should
2876 * look like this picture:
2877 *
2878 * @image html screenshots/segment_control_example.png
2879 * @image latex screenshots/segment_control_example.eps width=\textwidth
2880 *
2881 * @example segment_control_example.c
2882 */
2883
2884/**
2885 * @page flipselector_example Flip selector widget example
2886 *
2887 * This code places an Elementary flip selector widget on a window,
2888 * along with two buttons trigerring actions on it (though its API).
2889 *
2890 * The selector is being populated with the following items:
2891 * @dontinclude flipselector_example.c
2892 * @skip lbl[]
2893 * @until ;
2894 *
2895 * Next, we create it, populating it with those items and registering
2896 * two (smart) callbacks on it:
2897 * @dontinclude flipselector_example.c
2898 * @skip fp = elm_flipselector_add
2899 * @until object_show
2900 *
2901 * Those two callbacks will take place whenever one of those smart
2902 * events occur, and they will just print something to @c stdout:
2903 * @dontinclude flipselector_example.c
2904 * @skip underflow callback
2905 * @until }
2906 * @until }
2907 * Flip the sheets on the widget while looking at the items list, in
2908 * the source code, and you'll get the idea of those events.
2909 *
2910 * The two buttons below the flip selector will take the actions
2911 * described in their labels:
2912 * @dontinclude flipselector_example.c
2913 * @skip bt = elm_button_add
2914 * @until callback_add(win
2915 *
2916 * @dontinclude flipselector_example.c
2917 * @skip unselect the item
2918 * @until }
2919 * @until }
2920 *
2921 * Click on them to exercise those flip selector API calls. To
2922 * interact with the other parts of this API, there's a command line
2923 * interface, whose help string can be asked for with the 'h' key:
2924 * @dontinclude flipselector_example.c
2925 * @skip commands
2926 * @until ;
2927 *
2928 * The 'n' and 'p' keys will exemplify elm_flipselector_flip_next()
2929 * and elm_flipselector_flip_prev(), respectively. 'f' and 'l' account
2930 * for elm_flipselector_first_item_get() and
2931 * elm_flipselector_last_item_get(), respectively. Finally, 's' will
2932 * issue elm_flipselector_selected_item_get() on our example flip
2933 * selector widget.
2934 *
2935 * See the full @ref flipselector_example.c "example", whose window should
2936 * look like this picture:
2937 *
2938 * @image html screenshots/flipselector_example.png
2939 * @image latex screenshots/flipselector_example.eps width=\textwidth
2940 *
2941 * See the full @ref flipselector_example_c "source code" for this example.
2942 *
2943 */
2944
2945/**
2946 * @page fileselector_example File selector widget example
2947 *
2948 * This code places two Elementary file selector widgets on a window.
2949 * The one on the left is layouting file system items in a @b list,
2950 * while the the other is layouting them in a @b grid.
2951 *
2952 * The one having the majority of hooks of interest is on the left,
2953 * which we create as follows:
2954 * @dontinclude fileselector_example.c
2955 * @skip first file selector
2956 * @until object_show
2957 *
2958 * Note that we enable custom edition of file/directory selection, via
2959 * the text entry it has on its bottom, via
2960 * elm_fileselector_is_save_set(). It starts with the list view, which
2961 * is the default, and we make it not expandable in place
2962 * (elm_fileselector_expandable_set()), so that it replaces its view's
2963 * contents with the current directory's entries each time one
2964 * navigates to a different folder. For both of file selectors we are
2965 * starting to list the contents found in the @c "/tmp" directory
2966 * (elm_fileselector_path_set()).
2967 *
2968 * Note the code setting it to "grid mode" and observe the differences
2969 * in the file selector's views, in the example. We also hide the
2970 * second file selector's Ok/Cancel buttons -- since it's there just
2971 * to show the grid view (and navigation) -- via
2972 * elm_fileselector_buttons_ok_cancel_set().
2973 *
2974 * The @c "done" event, which triggers the callback below
2975 * @dontinclude fileselector_example.c
2976 * @skip 'done' cb
2977 * @until }
2978 * will be called at the time one clicks the "Ok"/"Cancel" buttons of
2979 * the file selector (on the left). Note that it will print the path
2980 * to the current selection, if any.
2981 *
2982 * The @c "selected" event, which triggers the callback below
2983 * @dontinclude fileselector_example.c
2984 * @skip bt = 'selected' cb
2985 * @until }
2986 * takes place when one selects a file (if the file selector is @b not
2987 * under folders-only mode) or when one selects a folder (when in
2988 * folders-only mode). Experiment it by selecting different file
2989 * system entries.
2990 *
2991 * What comes next is the code creating the three check boxes and two
2992 * buttons below the file selector in the right. They will exercise a
2993 * bunch of functions on the file selector's API, for the instance on
2994 * the left. Experiment with them, specially the buttons, to get the
2995 * difference between elm_fileselector_path_get() and
2996 * elm_fileselector_selected_get().
2997 *
2998 * Finally, there's the code adding the second file selector, on the
2999 * right:
3000 * @dontinclude fileselector_example.c
3001 * @skip second file selector
3002 * @until object_show
3003 *
3004 * Pay attention to the code setting it to "grid mode" and observe the
3005 * differences in the file selector's views, in the example. We also
3006 * hide the second file selector's Ok/Cancel buttons -- since it's
3007 * there just to show the grid view (and navigation) -- via
3008 * elm_fileselector_buttons_ok_cancel_set().
3009 *
3010 * See the full @ref fileselector_example.c "example", whose window
3011 * should look like this picture:
3012 *
3013 * @image html screenshots/fileselector_example.png
3014 * @image latex screenshots/fileselector_example.eps width=\textwidth
3015 *
3016 * See the full @ref fileselector_example_c "source code" for this example.
3017 *
3018 */
3019
3020/**
3021 * @page fileselector_button_example File selector button widget example
3022 *
3023 * This code places an Elementary file selector button widget on a
3024 * window, along with some other checkboxes and a text entry. Those
3025 * are there just as knobs on the file selector button's state and to
3026 * display information from it.
3027 *
3028 * Here's how we instantiate it:
3029 * @dontinclude fileselector_button_example.c
3030 * @skip ic = elm_icon_add
3031 * @until evas_object_show
3032 *
3033 * Note that we set on it both icon and label decorations. It's set to
3034 * list the contents of the @c "/tmp" directory, too, with
3035 * elm_fileselector_button_path_set(). What follows are checkboxes to
3036 * exercise some of its API funtions:
3037 * @dontinclude fileselector_button_example.c
3038 * @skip ck = elm_check_add
3039 * @until evas_object_show(en)
3040 *
3041 * The checkboxes will toggle whether the file selector button's
3042 * internal file selector:
3043 * - must have an editable text entry for file names (thus, be in
3044 * "save dialog mode")
3045 * - is to be raised as an "inner window" (note it's the default
3046 * behavior) or as a dedicated window
3047 * - is to populate its view with folders only
3048 * - is to expand its folders, in its view, <b>in place</b>, and not
3049 * repainting it entirely just with the contents of a sole
3050 * directory.
3051 *
3052 * The entry labeled @c "Last selection" will exercise the @c
3053 * "file,chosen" smart event coming from the file selector button:
3054 * @dontinclude fileselector_button_example.c
3055 * @skip hook on the
3056 * @until toggle inwin
3057 *
3058 * Whenever you dismiss or acknowledges the file selector, after it's
3059 * raised, the @c event_info string will contain the last selection on
3060 * it (if any was made).
3061 *
3062 * This is how the example, just after called, should look like:
3063 *
3064 * @image html screenshots/fileselector_button_example_00.png
3065 * @image latex screenshots/fileselector_button_example_00.eps width=\textwidth
3066 *
3067 * Click on the file selector button to raise its internal file
3068 * selector, which will be contained on an <b>"inner window"</b>:
3069 *
3070 * @image html screenshots/fileselector_button_example_01.png
3071 * @image latex screenshots/fileselector_button_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
3072 *
3073 * Toggle the "inwin mode" switch off and, if you click on the file
3074 * selector button again, you'll get @b two windows, the original one
3075 * (note the last selection there!)
3076 *
3077 * @image html screenshots/fileselector_button_example_02.png
3078 * @image latex screenshots/fileselector_button_example_02.eps width=\textwidth
3079 *
3080 * and the file selector's new one
3081 *
3082 * @image html screenshots/fileselector_button_example_03.png
3083 * @image latex screenshots/fileselector_button_example_03.eps width=\textwidth
3084 *
3085 * Play with the checkboxes to get the behavior changes on the file
3086 * selector button. The respective API calls on the widget coming from
3087 * those knobs where shown in the code already.
3088 *
3089 * See the full @ref fileselector_button_example_c "source code" for
3090 * this example.
3091 *
3092 */
3093
3094/**
3095 * @page fileselector_entry_example File selector entry widget example
3096 *
3097 * This code places an Elementary file selector entry widget on a
3098 * window, along with some other checkboxes. Those are there just as
3099 * knobs on the file selector entry's state.
3100 *
3101 * Here's how we instantiate it:
3102 * @dontinclude fileselector_entry_example.c
3103 * @skip ic = elm_icon_add
3104 * @until evas_object_show
3105 *
3106 * Note that we set on it's button both icon and label
3107 * decorations. It's set to exhibit the path of (and list the contents
3108 * of, when internal file selector is launched) the @c "/tmp"
3109 * directory, also, with elm_fileselector_entry_path_set(). What
3110 * follows are checkboxes to exercise some of its API funtions:
3111 * @dontinclude fileselector_entry_example.c
3112 * @skip ck = elm_check_add
3113 * @until callback_add(fs_entry
3114 *
3115 * The checkboxes will toggle whether the file selector entry's
3116 * internal file selector:
3117 * - must have an editable text entry for file names (thus, be in
3118 * "save dialog mode")
3119 * - is to be raised as an "inner window" (note it's the default
3120 * behavior) or as a dedicated window
3121 * - is to populate its view with folders only
3122 * - is to expand its folders, in its view, <b>in place</b>, and not
3123 * repainting it entirely just with the contents of a sole
3124 * directory.
3125 *
3126 * Observe how the entry's text will match the string coming from the
3127 * @c "file,chosen" smart event:
3128 * @dontinclude fileselector_entry_example.c
3129 * @skip hook on the
3130 * @until }
3131 * Whenever you dismiss or acknowledges the file selector, after it's
3132 * raised, the @c event_info string will contain the last selection on
3133 * it (if any was made).
3134 *
3135 * Try, also, to type in a valid system path and, then, open the file
3136 * selector's window: it will start the file browsing there, for you.
3137 *
3138 * This is how the example, just after called, should look like:
3139 *
3140 * @image html screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_00.png
3141 * @image latex screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_00.eps width=\textwidth
3142 *
3143 * Click on the file selector entry to raise its internal file
3144 * selector, which will be contained on an <b>"inner window"</b>:
3145 *
3146 * @image html screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_01.png
3147 * @image latex screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
3148 *
3149 * Toggle the "inwin mode" switch off and, if you click on the file
3150 * selector entry again, you'll get @b two windows, the original one
3151 * (note the last selection there!)
3152 *
3153 * @image html screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_02.png
3154 * @image latex screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_02.eps width=\textwidth
3155 *
3156 * and the file selector's new one
3157 *
3158 * @image html screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_03.png
3159 * @image latex screenshots/fileselector_entry_example_03.eps width=\textwidth
3160 *
3161 * Play with the checkboxes to get the behavior changes on the file
3162 * selector entry. The respective API calls on the widget coming from
3163 * those knobs where shown in the code already.
3164 *
3165 * See the full @ref fileselector_entry_example_c "source code" for
3166 * this example.
3167 *
3168 */
3169
3170/**
3171 * @page layout_example_01 Layout - Content, Table and Box
3172 *
3173 * This example shows how one can use the @ref Layout widget to create a
3174 * customized distribution of widgets on the screen, controlled by an Edje theme.
3175 * The full source code for this example can be found at @ref
3176 * layout_example_01_c.
3177 *
3178 * Our custom layout is defined by a file, @ref layout_example_edc, which is an
3179 * Edje theme file. Look for the Edje documentation to understand it. For now,
3180 * it's enough to know that we describe some specific parts on this layout
3181 * theme:
3182 * @li a title text field;
3183 * @li a box container;
3184 * @li a table container;
3185 * @li and a content container.
3186 *
3187 * Going straight to the code, the following snippet instantiates the layout
3188 * widget:
3189 *
3190 * @dontinclude layout_example_01.c
3191 * @skip elm_layout_add
3192 * @until evas_object_show(layout)
3193 *
3194 * As any other widget, we set some properties for the size calculation. But
3195 * notice on this piece of code the call to the function elm_layout_file_set().
3196 * Here is where the theme file is loaded, and particularly the specific group
3197 * from this theme file. Also notice that the theme file here is referenced as
3198 * an .edj, which is a .edc theme file compiled to its binary form. Again, look
3199 * for the Edje documentation for more information about theme files.
3200 *
3201 * Next, we fetch from our theme a data string referenced by the key "title".
3202 * This data was defined in the theme, and can be used as parameters which the
3203 * program get from the specific theme that it is using. In this case, we store
3204 * the title of this window and program in the theme, as a "data" entry, just
3205 * for demonstration purposes:
3206 *
3207 * @until }
3208 *
3209 * This call elm_layout_data_get() is used to fetch the string based on the key,
3210 * and elm_object_part_text_set() will set the part defined in the theme as
3211 * "example/title" to contain this string. This key "example/title" has nothing
3212 * special. It's just an arbitrary convention that we are using in this example.
3213 * Every string in this example referencing a part of this theme will be of the
3214 * form "example/<something>".
3215 *
3216 * Now let's start using our layout to distribute things on the window space.
3217 * Since the layout was added as a resize object to the elementary window, it
3218 * will always occupy the entire space available for this window.
3219 *
3220 * The theme already has a title, and it also defines a table element which is
3221 * positioned approximately between 50% and 70% of the height of this window,
3222 * and has 100% of the width. We create some widgets (two icons, a clock and a
3223 * button) and pack them inside the table, in a distribution similar to a HTML
3224 * table:
3225 *
3226 * @until evas_object_show(bt)
3227 *
3228 * Notice that we just set size hints for every object, and call the function
3229 * elm_layout_table_pack(), which does all the work. It will place the elements
3230 * in the specified row/column, with row and column span if required, and then
3231 * the object's size and position will be controlled by the layout widget. It
3232 * will also respect size hints, alignments and weight properties set to these
3233 * widgets. The resulting distribution on the screen depends on the table
3234 * properties (described in the theme), the size hints set on each widget, and
3235 * on the cells of the table that are being used.
3236 *
3237 * For instance, we add the two icons and the clock on the first, second and
3238 * third cells of the first row, and add the button the second row, making it
3239 * span for 3 columns (thus having the size of the entire table width). This
3240 * will result in a table that has 2 rows and 3 columns.
3241 *
3242 * Now let's add some widgets to the box area of our layout. This box is around
3243 * 20% and 50% of the vertical size of the layout, and 100% of its width. The
3244 * theme defines that it will use an "horizontal flow" distribution to its
3245 * elements. Unlike the table, a box will distribute elements without knowing
3246 * about rows and columns, and the distribution function selected will take care
3247 * of putting them in row, column, both, or any other available layout. This is
3248 * also described in the Edje documentation.
3249 *
3250 * This box area is similar to the @ref Box widget of elementary, with the
3251 * difference that its position and properties are controlled by the theme of the
3252 * layout. It also contains more than one API to add items to it, since the
3253 * items position now is defined in terms of a list of items, not a matrix.
3254 * There's the first position (can have items added to it with
3255 * elm_layout_box_prepend()), the last position (elm_layout_box_append()), the
3256 * nth position (elm_layout_box_insert_at()) and the position right before an
3257 * element (elm_layout_box_insert_before()). We use insert_at and prepend
3258 * functions to add the first two buttons to this box, and insert_before on the
3259 * callback of each button. The callback code will be shown later, but it
3260 * basically adds a button just before the clicked button using the
3261 * elm_layout_box_insert_before() function. Here's the code for adding the first
3262 * 2 buttons:
3263 *
3264 * @until evas_object_show(item)
3265 * @until evas_object_show(item)
3266 *
3267 * Finally, we have an area in this layout theme, in the bottom part of it,
3268 * reserved for adding an specific widget. Differently from the 2 parts
3269 * described until now, this one can only receive one widget with the call
3270 * elm_object_part_content_set() for the layout. If there was already an item on this specific part,
3271 * it will be deleted (one can use elm_object_part_content_unset() in order to remove
3272 * it without deleting). An example of removing it without deleting, but
3273 * manually deleting this widget just after that, can be seen on the callback
3274 * for this button. Actually, the callback defined for this button will clean
3275 * the two other parts (deleting all of their elements) and then remove and
3276 * delete this button.
3277 *
3278 * @until _swallow_btn_cb
3279 *
3280 * Also notice that, for this last added button, we don't have to call
3281 * evas_object_show() on it. This is a particularity of the theme for layouts,
3282 * that will have total control over the properties like size, position,
3283 * visibility and clipping of a widget added with elm_object_part_content_set().
3284 * Again, read the Edje documentation to understand this better.
3285 *
3286 * Now we just put the code for the different callbacks specified for each kind
3287 * of button and make simple comments about them:
3288 *
3289 * @dontinclude layout_example_01.c
3290 * @skip static void
3291 * @until evas_object_del(item)
3292 * @until }
3293 *
3294 * The first callback is used for the button in the table, and will just remove
3295 * itself from the table with elm_layout_table_unpack(), which remove items
3296 * without deleting them, and then calling evas_object_del() on itself.
3297 *
3298 * The second callback is for buttons added to the box. When clicked, these
3299 * buttons will create a new button, and add them to the same box, in the
3300 * position just before the clicked button.
3301 *
3302 * And the last callback is for the button added to the "content" area. It will
3303 * clear both the table and the box, passing @c EINA_TRUE to their respective @c
3304 * clear parameters, which will imply on the items of these containers being
3305 * deleted.
3306 *
3307 * A screenshot of this example can be seen on:
3308 *
3309 * @image html screenshots/layout_example_01.png
3310 * @image latex screenshots/layout_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
3311 *
3312 */
3313
3314/**
3315 * @page layout_example_02 Layout - Predefined Layout
3316 *
3317 * This example shows how one can use the @ref Layout with a predefined theme
3318 * layout to add a back and next button to a simple window. The full source code
3319 * for this example can be found at @ref layout_example_02_c.
3320 *
3321 * After setting up the window and background, we add the layout widget to the
3322 * window. But instead of using elm_layout_file_set() to load its theme from a
3323 * custom theme file, we can use elm_layout_theme_set() to load one of the
3324 * predefined layouts that come with elementary. Particularly on this example,
3325 * we load the them of class "layout", group "application" and style
3326 * "content-back-next" (since we want the back and next buttons).
3327 *
3328 * @dontinclude layout_example_02.c
3329 * @skip elm_layout_add
3330 * @until evas_object_show(layout)
3331 *
3332 * This default theme contains only a "content" area named
3333 * "elm.swallow.content", where we can add any widget (it can be even a
3334 * container widget, like a box, frame, list, or even another layout). Since we
3335 * just want to show the resulting layout, we add a simple icon to it:
3336 *
3337 * @until layout_content_set
3338 *
3339 * This default layout also provides some signals when the next and prev buttons
3340 * are clicked. We can register callbacks to them with the
3341 * elm_object_signal_callback_add() function:
3342 *
3343 * @until elm,action,next
3344 *
3345 * In the @ref layout_example_03 you can see how to send signals to the layout with
3346 * elm_object_signal_emit().
3347 *
3348 * Now our callback just changes the picture being displayed when one of the
3349 * buttons are clicked:
3350 *
3351 * @dontinclude layout_example_02.c
3352 * @skip images
3353 * @until standard_set
3354 * @until }
3355 *
3356 * It's possible to see that it gets the name of the image being shown from the
3357 * array of image names, going forward on this array when "next" is clicked and
3358 * backward when "back" is clicked.
3359 *
3360 * A screenshot of this example can be seen on:
3361 *
3362 * @image html screenshots/layout_example_02.png
3363 * @image latex screenshots/layout_example_02.eps width=\textwidth
3364 */
3365
3366/**
3367 * @page layout_example_03 Layout - Signals and Size Changed
3368 *
3369 * This example shows how one can send and receive signals to/from the layout,
3370 * and what to do when the layout theme has its size changed. The full source
3371 * code for this example can be found at @ref layout_example_03_c.
3372 *
3373 * In this exmaple we will use another group from the same layout theme file
3374 * used in @ref layout_example_01. Its instantiation and loading happens in the
3375 * following lines:
3376 *
3377 * @dontinclude layout_example_03.c
3378 * @skip elm_layout_add
3379 * @until evas_object_show
3380 *
3381 * This time we register a callback to be called whenever we receive a signal
3382 * after the end of the animation that happens in this layout:
3383 *