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authorXavi Artigas <xavierartigas@yahoo.es>2019-01-28 13:14:20 +0100
committerXavi Artigas <xavierartigas@yahoo.es>2019-01-28 13:14:20 +0100
commitc55299ca51e2d0e233549c861608fefe231f2877 (patch)
tree40de1ff30583018e5bc2a3abdca5004c2b945b77 /doc
parent37313986226c5ec05375ff6ae394585085efe211 (diff)
docs: Fix assorted typos in legacy documentation
Samsung reported a long list of typos in our legacy docs, this fixes them.
Diffstat (limited to 'doc')
-rw-r--r--doc/ecore_examples.dox2
-rw-r--r--doc/elementary_examples.dox30
-rw-r--r--doc/elementary_examples_cxx.dox84
-rw-r--r--doc/elementary_examples_js.dox6
4 files changed, 61 insertions, 61 deletions
diff --git a/doc/ecore_examples.dox b/doc/ecore_examples.dox
index bf25fa3..6454277 100644
--- a/doc/ecore_examples.dox
+++ b/doc/ecore_examples.dox
@@ -1575,7 +1575,7 @@
1575 * @skip ecore_main_fd_handler_add 1575 * @skip ecore_main_fd_handler_add
1576 * @until ; 1576 * @until ;
1577 * 1577 *
1578 * If you don't remenber the parameters of @ref ecore_main_fd_handler_add, 1578 * If you don't remember the parameters of @ref ecore_main_fd_handler_add,
1579 * please check its documentation. 1579 * please check its documentation.
1580 * 1580 *
1581 * Now that we have our handler registered we will start the ecore's main loop: 1581 * Now that we have our handler registered we will start the ecore's main loop:
diff --git a/doc/elementary_examples.dox b/doc/elementary_examples.dox
index af37ae2..dc7acba 100644
--- a/doc/elementary_examples.dox
+++ b/doc/elementary_examples.dox
@@ -617,7 +617,7 @@
617 * project's build system, we're assuming they are the canonical ones. 617 * project's build system, we're assuming they are the canonical ones.
618 * 618 *
619 * After the program starts, elm_app_info_set() will actually run and 619 * After the program starts, elm_app_info_set() will actually run and
620 * then you'll see an intrincasy: Elementary does the prefix lookup @b 620 * then you'll see a problem: Elementary does the prefix lookup @b
621 * twice. This is so because of the quicklaunch infrastructure in 621 * twice. This is so because of the quicklaunch infrastructure in
622 * Elementary (@ref Start), which will register a predefined prefix 622 * Elementary (@ref Start), which will register a predefined prefix
623 * for possible users of the launch schema. We're not hooking into a 623 * for possible users of the launch schema. We're not hooking into a
@@ -2112,7 +2112,7 @@
2112 * We'll start this example in the same way 2112 * We'll start this example in the same way
2113 * @ref map_example_01 "Map Example 1". Adding a map with buttons to control 2113 * @ref map_example_01 "Map Example 1". Adding a map with buttons to control
2114 * zoom, so if you didn't read it yet, just do it now. Actually there is 2114 * zoom, so if you didn't read it yet, just do it now. Actually there is
2115 * a change, that we're aligning buttons to the top, since we wan't a 2115 * a change, that we're aligning buttons to the top, since we want a
2116 * vertical control box this time. 2116 * vertical control box this time.
2117 * @dontinclude map_example_03.c 2117 * @dontinclude map_example_03.c
2118 * @skipline elm_map_add 2118 * @skipline elm_map_add
@@ -2125,8 +2125,8 @@
2125 * @skipline horizontal_set 2125 * @skipline horizontal_set
2126 * @until align_set 2126 * @until align_set
2127 * 2127 *
2128 * We'll add an entry with a preliminar address, that I know will 2128 * We'll add an entry with a preliminary address, that I know will
2129 * find a coordinate, to examplify names work. But you can try 2129 * find a coordinate, to exemplify how names work. But you can try
2130 * lots of addresses. From city or country names to pubs, or whatever 2130 * lots of addresses. From city or country names to pubs, or whatever
2131 * you want. To try is enough to run the example, type the address and 2131 * you want. To try is enough to run the example, type the address and
2132 * press "Route" button. This button will call a function that will 2132 * press "Route" button. This button will call a function that will
@@ -2220,7 +2220,7 @@
2220 * We are just adding the diskselector, so as you can see, defaults for it are: 2220 * We are just adding the diskselector, so as you can see, defaults for it are:
2221 * @li Only 3 items visible each time. 2221 * @li Only 3 items visible each time.
2222 * @li Only 3 characters are displayed for labels on side positions. 2222 * @li Only 3 characters are displayed for labels on side positions.
2223 * @li The first added item remains centeres, i.e., it's the selected item. 2223 * @li The first added item remains centered, i.e., it's the selected item.
2224 * 2224 *
2225 * To add items, we are just appending it on a loop, using function 2225 * To add items, we are just appending it on a loop, using function
2226 * elm_diskselector_item_append(), that will be better explained on 2226 * elm_diskselector_item_append(), that will be better explained on
@@ -2307,7 +2307,7 @@
2307 * The first parameter of elm_diskselector_item_append() is the diskselector 2307 * The first parameter of elm_diskselector_item_append() is the diskselector
2308 * object, that we are receiving as data on our callback function. 2308 * object, that we are receiving as data on our callback function.
2309 * The second one is a label, the string that will be placed in the center 2309 * The second one is a label, the string that will be placed in the center
2310 * of our item. As we don't wan't icons or callback functions, we can 2310 * of our item. As we don't want icons or callback functions, we can
2311 * send NULL as third, fourth and fifth parameters. 2311 * send NULL as third, fourth and fifth parameters.
2312 * 2312 *
2313 * <b> Appending an item with icon: </b> 2313 * <b> Appending an item with icon: </b>
@@ -2543,7 +2543,7 @@
2543 * The first parameter of elm_list_item_prepend() is the list 2543 * The first parameter of elm_list_item_prepend() is the list
2544 * object, that we are receiving as data on our callback function. 2544 * object, that we are receiving as data on our callback function.
2545 * The second one is a label, the string that will be placed in the center 2545 * The second one is a label, the string that will be placed in the center
2546 * of our item. As we don't wan't icons or callback functions, we can 2546 * of our item. As we don't want icons or callback functions, we can
2547 * send NULL as third, fourth, fifth and sixth parameters. 2547 * send NULL as third, fourth, fifth and sixth parameters.
2548 * 2548 *
2549 * <b> Appending an item: </b> 2549 * <b> Appending an item: </b>
@@ -3033,7 +3033,7 @@
3033 * Note that we set on it both icon and label decorations. It's set to 3033 * Note that we set on it both icon and label decorations. It's set to
3034 * list the contents of the @c "/tmp" directory, too, with 3034 * list the contents of the @c "/tmp" directory, too, with
3035 * elm_fileselector_button_path_set(). What follows are checkboxes to 3035 * elm_fileselector_button_path_set(). What follows are checkboxes to
3036 * exercise some of its API funtions: 3036 * exercise some of its API functions:
3037 * @dontinclude fileselector_button_example.c 3037 * @dontinclude fileselector_button_example.c
3038 * @skip ck = elm_check_add 3038 * @skip ck = elm_check_add
3039 * @until evas_object_show(en) 3039 * @until evas_object_show(en)
@@ -3107,7 +3107,7 @@
3107 * decorations. It's set to exhibit the path of (and list the contents 3107 * decorations. It's set to exhibit the path of (and list the contents
3108 * of, when internal file selector is launched) the @c "/tmp" 3108 * of, when internal file selector is launched) the @c "/tmp"
3109 * directory, also, with elm_fileselector_entry_path_set(). What 3109 * directory, also, with elm_fileselector_entry_path_set(). What
3110 * follows are checkboxes to exercise some of its API funtions: 3110 * follows are checkboxes to exercise some of its API functions:
3111 * @dontinclude fileselector_entry_example.c 3111 * @dontinclude fileselector_entry_example.c
3112 * @skip ck = elm_check_add 3112 * @skip ck = elm_check_add
3113 * @until callback_add(fs_entry 3113 * @until callback_add(fs_entry
@@ -3370,7 +3370,7 @@
3370 * and what to do when the layout theme has its size changed. The full source 3370 * and what to do when the layout theme has its size changed. The full source
3371 * code for this example can be found at @ref layout_example_03_c. 3371 * code for this example can be found at @ref layout_example_03_c.
3372 * 3372 *
3373 * In this exmaple we will use another group from the same layout theme file 3373 * In this example we will use another group from the same layout theme file
3374 * used in @ref layout_example_01. Its instantiation and loading happens in the 3374 * used in @ref layout_example_01. Its instantiation and loading happens in the
3375 * following lines: 3375 * following lines:
3376 * 3376 *
@@ -3909,7 +3909,7 @@
3909 * It will get the last index item selected's data and find the 3909 * It will get the last index item selected's data and find the
3910 * respective index item handle(#Elm_Object_Item) with elm_index_item_find(). 3910 * respective index item handle(#Elm_Object_Item) with elm_index_item_find().
3911 * We need the latter to query the indexing letter string from, with 3911 * We need the latter to query the indexing letter string from, with
3912 * elm_index_item_letter_get(). Next, comes the delition, itself, 3912 * elm_index_item_letter_get(). Next, comes the deletion itself,
3913 * which will also trigger the @c _index_item_del callback function, 3913 * which will also trigger the @c _index_item_del callback function,
3914 * as said above. 3914 * as said above.
3915 * 3915 *
@@ -4450,7 +4450,7 @@
4450 * 4450 *
4451 * We'll begin by showing a few structures used throught the program. First, 4451 * We'll begin by showing a few structures used throught the program. First,
4452 * the application owns data that holds the main window and the main entry 4452 * the application owns data that holds the main window and the main entry
4453 * where the editting happens. Then, an auxiliar structure we'll use later 4453 * where the editting happens. Then, an auxiliary structure we'll use later
4454 * when inserting icons in our text. 4454 * when inserting icons in our text.
4455 * @dontinclude entry_example.c 4455 * @dontinclude entry_example.c
4456 * @skip typedef 4456 * @skip typedef
@@ -5451,7 +5451,7 @@
5451 * controls will exercise most of the slideshow's API functions. 5451 * controls will exercise most of the slideshow's API functions.
5452 * 5452 *
5453 * We create the slideshow, itself, first, making it @b loop on its 5453 * We create the slideshow, itself, first, making it @b loop on its
5454 * image itens, when in slideshow mode: 5454 * image items, when in slideshow mode:
5455 * @dontinclude slideshow_example.c 5455 * @dontinclude slideshow_example.c
5456 * @skip slideshow = elm_slideshow_add 5456 * @skip slideshow = elm_slideshow_add
5457 * @until evas_object_show 5457 * @until evas_object_show
@@ -6218,7 +6218,7 @@
6218 * @skipline } 6218 * @skipline }
6219 * @skipline } 6219 * @skipline }
6220 * 6220 *
6221 * Other @c INT type widget implementations may exist, as is exemplifyed 6221 * Other @c INT type widget implementations may exist, as is exemplified
6222 * on the item that follows. 6222 * on the item that follows.
6223 * 6223 *
6224 * @skip item { 6224 * @skip item {
@@ -6877,4 +6877,4 @@
6877 * @image latex screenshots/combobox_example_01.eps width=\textwidth 6877 * @image latex screenshots/combobox_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
6878 * 6878 *
6879 * @example combobox_example_01.c 6879 * @example combobox_example_01.c
6880 */ \ No newline at end of file 6880 */
diff --git a/doc/elementary_examples_cxx.dox b/doc/elementary_examples_cxx.dox
index 7b45ed9..6197450 100644
--- a/doc/elementary_examples_cxx.dox
+++ b/doc/elementary_examples_cxx.dox
@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@
60 60
61 * With this tutorial we'll give you a better view of how the lambda 61 * With this tutorial we'll give you a better view of how the lambda
62 * function can and will be constantly use in the C++ bindings. For a 62 * function can and will be constantly use in the C++ bindings. For a
63 * more broad aproach you should do a little web research. 63 * more broad approach you should do a little web research.
64 64
65 * The syntax adopted for these examples: 65 * The syntax adopted for these examples:
66 66
@@ -200,7 +200,7 @@
200 * @until elm_policy_set 200 * @until elm_policy_set
201 201
202 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 202 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
203 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 203 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
204 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 204 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
205 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 205 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
206 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 206 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -323,7 +323,7 @@
323 * @until elm_policy_set 323 * @until elm_policy_set
324 324
325 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 325 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
326 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 326 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
327 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 327 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
328 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 328 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
329 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 329 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -488,7 +488,7 @@
488 * @until elm_policy_set 488 * @until elm_policy_set
489 489
490 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 490 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
491 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 491 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
492 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 492 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
493 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 493 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
494 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 494 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -660,7 +660,7 @@
660 * @until elm_policy_set 660 * @until elm_policy_set
661 661
662 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 662 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
663 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 663 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
664 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 664 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
665 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 665 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
666 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 666 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -837,7 +837,7 @@
837 * @until elm_policy_set 837 * @until elm_policy_set
838 838
839 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 839 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
840 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 840 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
841 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 841 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
842 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 842 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
843 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 843 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -1030,13 +1030,13 @@
1030 1030
1031 * For the up button, we'll set to @p true the autorepeat, 1031 * For the up button, we'll set to @p true the autorepeat,
1032 * autorepeat_initial_timeout, autoreapet_gap_timeout, the size hints 1032 * autorepeat_initial_timeout, autoreapet_gap_timeout, the size hints
1033 * for weight and alignement, choose our packing method and making out 1033 * for weight and alignment, choose our packing method and making out
1034 * up button visible. 1034 * up button visible.
1035 1035
1036 * @skip up 1036 * @skip up
1037 * @until visibility 1037 * @until visibility
1038 1038
1039 * For this directional buttons we'll have a diferent repeated 1039 * For this directional buttons we'll have a different repeated
1040 * callback that will insure the timeouts of our middle button in the 1040 * callback that will insure the timeouts of our middle button in the
1041 * gap and initial timeout that is current setted. 1041 * gap and initial timeout that is current setted.
1042 1042
@@ -1123,7 +1123,7 @@
1123 * @until elm_policy_set 1123 * @until elm_policy_set
1124 1124
1125 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 1125 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
1126 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 1126 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
1127 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 1127 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
1128 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 1128 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
1129 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 1129 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -1258,7 +1258,7 @@
1258 * @until elm_policy_set 1258 * @until elm_policy_set
1259 1259
1260 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 1260 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
1261 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 1261 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
1262 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 1262 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
1263 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 1263 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
1264 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 1264 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -1441,7 +1441,7 @@
1441 * @until elm_policy_set 1441 * @until elm_policy_set
1442 1442
1443 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 1443 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
1444 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 1444 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
1445 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 1445 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
1446 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 1446 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
1447 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 1447 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -1580,7 +1580,7 @@
1580 * @until elm_policy_set 1580 * @until elm_policy_set
1581 1581
1582 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 1582 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
1583 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 1583 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
1584 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 1584 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
1585 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 1585 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
1586 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 1586 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -1825,7 +1825,7 @@
1825 * @until elm_policy_set 1825 * @until elm_policy_set
1826 1826
1827 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 1827 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
1828 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 1828 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
1829 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 1829 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
1830 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 1830 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
1831 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 1831 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -1992,7 +1992,7 @@
1992 * @until elm_policy_set 1992 * @until elm_policy_set
1993 1993
1994 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 1994 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
1995 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 1995 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
1996 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 1996 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
1997 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 1997 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
1998 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 1998 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -2127,7 +2127,7 @@
2127 * @skip pack_end 2127 * @skip pack_end
2128 * @until visibility 2128 * @until visibility
2129 2129
2130 * The second clock shows ther am/pm time, that we also create with 2130 * The second clock shows the am/pm time, that we also create with
2131 * the C++ binding method, passing our window object as 2131 * the C++ binding method, passing our window object as
2132 * parent. Setting show_am_pm to true and again choosing the packing 2132 * parent. Setting show_am_pm to true and again choosing the packing
2133 * method and making clock visible. 2133 * method and making clock visible.
@@ -2205,7 +2205,7 @@
2205 * @until elm_policy_set 2205 * @until elm_policy_set
2206 2206
2207 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 2207 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
2208 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 2208 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
2209 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 2209 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
2210 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 2210 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
2211 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 2211 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -2419,7 +2419,7 @@
2419 * @until visibility 2419 * @until visibility
2420 2420
2421 * For our second datetime, we'll also set the size hints weight and 2421 * For our second datetime, we'll also set the size hints weight and
2422 * align, but in this case, the filds YEAR, MONTH and DATE will be not 2422 * align, but in this case, the fields YEAR, MONTH and DATE will be not
2423 * visible, and thus displaying in our datetime the hour, minute and 2423 * visible, and thus displaying in our datetime the hour, minute and
2424 * AM/PM. Finally we choose it's packing method and set the visibility 2424 * AM/PM. Finally we choose it's packing method and set the visibility
2425 * of datetime to @p true. 2425 * of datetime to @p true.
@@ -2513,7 +2513,7 @@
2513 * @until linked 2513 * @until linked
2514 2514
2515 * In this function we load the vertex/fragment shaders, create the 2515 * In this function we load the vertex/fragment shaders, create the
2516 * program object and finish our funtion. 2516 * program object and finish our function.
2517 2517
2518 * @skip gld 2518 * @skip gld
2519 * @until return 1; 2519 * @until return 1;
@@ -2585,7 +2585,7 @@
2585 * @skipline elm_policy_set 2585 * @skipline elm_policy_set
2586 2586
2587 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 2587 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
2588 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 2588 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
2589 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 2589 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
2590 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 2590 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
2591 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 2591 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -2883,7 +2883,7 @@
2883 * @skipline elm_policy_set 2883 * @skipline elm_policy_set
2884 2884
2885 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 2885 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
2886 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 2886 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
2887 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 2887 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
2888 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 2888 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
2889 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 2889 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -3031,7 +3031,7 @@
3031 * @until elm_policy_set 3031 * @until elm_policy_set
3032 3032
3033 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 3033 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
3034 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 3034 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
3035 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 3035 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
3036 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 3036 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
3037 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 3037 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -3248,7 +3248,7 @@
3248 * @skipline elm_policy_set 3248 * @skipline elm_policy_set
3249 3249
3250 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 3250 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
3251 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 3251 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
3252 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 3252 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
3253 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 3253 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
3254 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 3254 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -3462,7 +3462,7 @@
3462 * @skipline elm_policy_set 3462 * @skipline elm_policy_set
3463 3463
3464 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 3464 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
3465 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 3465 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
3466 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 3466 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
3467 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 3467 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
3468 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 3468 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -3604,7 +3604,7 @@
3604 * @until elm_policy_set 3604 * @until elm_policy_set
3605 3605
3606 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 3606 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
3607 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 3607 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
3608 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 3608 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
3609 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 3609 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
3610 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 3610 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -3736,7 +3736,7 @@
3736 * @until elm_policy_set 3736 * @until elm_policy_set
3737 3737
3738 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 3738 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
3739 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 3739 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
3740 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 3740 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
3741 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 3741 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
3742 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 3742 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -3997,7 +3997,7 @@
3997 * @dontinclude separator_cxx_example_01.cc 3997 * @dontinclude separator_cxx_example_01.cc
3998 3998
3999 * Separator is a very thin object used to separate other objects, 3999 * Separator is a very thin object used to separate other objects,
4000 * wich can be vertical or horizontal. 4000 * which can be vertical or horizontal.
4001 4001
4002 * This example shows how to create a window and separate in two 4002 * This example shows how to create a window and separate in two
4003 * parts, each one will be filled with a background color to show the 4003 * parts, each one will be filled with a background color to show the
@@ -4031,7 +4031,7 @@
4031 * @until elm_policy_set 4031 * @until elm_policy_set
4032 4032
4033 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 4033 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
4034 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 4034 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
4035 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 4035 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
4036 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 4036 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
4037 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 4037 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -4268,7 +4268,7 @@
4268 * @until elm_policy_set 4268 * @until elm_policy_set
4269 4269
4270 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 4270 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
4271 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 4271 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
4272 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 4272 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
4273 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 4273 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
4274 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 4274 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -4573,7 +4573,7 @@
4573 * @until elm_policy_set 4573 * @until elm_policy_set
4574 4574
4575 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 4575 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
4576 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 4576 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
4577 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 4577 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
4578 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 4578 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
4579 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 4579 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -4874,7 +4874,7 @@
4874 * @until elm_policy_set 4874 * @until elm_policy_set
4875 4875
4876 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 4876 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
4877 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 4877 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
4878 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 4878 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
4879 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 4879 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
4880 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 4880 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -4958,15 +4958,15 @@
4958 4958
4959 * @li row - Row number 4959 * @li row - Row number
4960 4960
4961 * @li colspan - Number of columns that the subobj will occuppy 4961 * @li colspan - Number of columns that the subobj will occupy
4962 4962
4963 * @li rowspan - Number of rows that the subobj will occuppy 4963 * @li rowspan - Number of rows that the subobj will occupy
4964 4964
4965 * @note All positioning inside the table is relative to rows and 4965 * @note All positioning inside the table is relative to rows and
4966 * columns, so a value of 0 for @a column and @a row, means the top 4966 * columns, so a value of 0 for @a column and @a row, means the top
4967 * left cell of the table. And for example, value of 2 for @a colspan and @a 4967 * left cell of the table. And for example, value of 2 for @a colspan and @a
4968 * rowspan indicates that the subobj will occuppy two column and two rows, 4968 * rowspan indicates that the subobj will occupy two columns and two rows,
4969 * thus occuppying 4 cells in total. 4969 * thus occupying 4 cells in total.
4970 4970
4971 * Finally we just have to make our window visible. Then run the elm 4971 * Finally we just have to make our window visible. Then run the elm
4972 * mainloop, starting to handle events and drawing operations. 4972 * mainloop, starting to handle events and drawing operations.
@@ -5018,7 +5018,7 @@
5018 * @until elm_policy_set 5018 * @until elm_policy_set
5019 5019
5020 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 5020 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
5021 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 5021 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
5022 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 5022 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
5023 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 5023 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
5024 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 5024 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -5075,7 +5075,7 @@
5075 * @until homogeneous 5075 * @until homogeneous
5076 5076
5077 * For each cell of this table we are going to create a unique @p 5077 * For each cell of this table we are going to create a unique @p
5078 * evas::rectangle, each with diferent colors and sizes. 5078 * evas::rectangle, each with different colors and sizes.
5079 5079
5080 * Let's see a snip of the code on how we constructed our rectangles 5080 * Let's see a snip of the code on how we constructed our rectangles
5081 * and setted the colors. 5081 * and setted the colors.
@@ -5120,15 +5120,15 @@
5120 5120
5121 * @li row - Row number 5121 * @li row - Row number
5122 5122
5123 * @li colspan - Number of columns that the subobj will occuppy 5123 * @li colspan - Number of columns that the subobj will occupy
5124 5124
5125 * @li rowspan - Number of rows that the subobj will occuppy 5125 * @li rowspan - Number of rows that the subobj will occupy
5126 5126
5127 * @note All positioning inside the table is relative to rows and 5127 * @note All positioning inside the table is relative to rows and
5128 * columns, so a value of 0 for @a column and @a row, means the top 5128 * columns, so a value of 0 for @a column and @a row, means the top
5129 * left cell of the table. And for example, value of 2 for @a colspan 5129 * left cell of the table. And for example, value of 2 for @a colspan
5130 * and @a rowspan indicates that the subobj will occuppy two column 5130 * and @a rowspan indicates that the subobj will occupy two column
5131 * and two rows, thus occuppying 4 cells in total. 5131 * and two rows, thus occupying 4 cells in total.
5132 5132
5133 * So for each rectangle we are setting a specific location and how 5133 * So for each rectangle we are setting a specific location and how
5134 * many cells it's occupying, better seem below: 5134 * many cells it's occupying, better seem below:
@@ -5202,7 +5202,7 @@
5202 * @skipline elm_policy_set 5202 * @skipline elm_policy_set
5203 5203
5204 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win 5204 * As you can see, the policy we chose was to quit when the last win
5205 * is hidden as opose to examples with the C bindings where we 5205 * is hidden as opposed to examples with the C bindings where we
5206 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed 5206 * perpetually set it to quit when last win was closed. This changed
5207 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop 5207 * was necessary because in C++ binding as the elm mainloop stop
5208 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and 5208 * running all object are destroyed, references are unreferenced and
@@ -5329,4 +5329,4 @@
5329 5329
5330 * @image latex screenshots/thumb_cxx_example_01.eps width=\textwidth 5330 * @image latex screenshots/thumb_cxx_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
5331 * @example thumb_cxx_example_01.cc 5331 * @example thumb_cxx_example_01.cc
5332 */ \ No newline at end of file 5332 */
diff --git a/doc/elementary_examples_js.dox b/doc/elementary_examples_js.dox
index 37f867a..bcd119b 100644
--- a/doc/elementary_examples_js.dox
+++ b/doc/elementary_examples_js.dox
@@ -627,7 +627,7 @@
627 * @skip pack_end 627 * @skip pack_end
628 * @until visible 628 * @until visible
629 629
630 * The second clock shows ther am/pm time, that we also create with 630 * The second clock shows the am/pm time, that we also create with
631 * the JS binding method, passing our window object as 631 * the JS binding method, passing our window object as
632 * parent. Setting show_am_pm to true and again choosing the packing 632 * parent. Setting show_am_pm to true and again choosing the packing
633 * method and making clock visible. 633 * method and making clock visible.
@@ -701,7 +701,7 @@
701 * @dontinclude separator_example_01.js 701 * @dontinclude separator_example_01.js
702 702
703 * Separator is a very thin object used to separate other objects, 703 * Separator is a very thin object used to separate other objects,
704 * wich can be vertical or horizontal. 704 * which can be vertical or horizontal.
705 705
706 * This example shows how to create a window and separate in two 706 * This example shows how to create a window and separate in two
707 * parts, each one will be filled with a background color to show the 707 * parts, each one will be filled with a background color to show the
@@ -1019,4 +1019,4 @@
1019 * @image latex screenshots/icon_example_01.eps width=\textwidth 1019 * @image latex screenshots/icon_example_01.eps width=\textwidth
1020 1020
1021 * @example icon_example_01.js 1021 * @example icon_example_01.js
1022 */ \ No newline at end of file 1022 */