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authorGustavo Sverzut Barbieri <barbieri@gmail.com>2012-12-28 23:26:05 +0000
committerGustavo Sverzut Barbieri <barbieri@gmail.com>2012-12-28 23:26:05 +0000
commit2608f68571b277967b2e27d6136c95f03befd183 (patch)
tree24a3b2764432b9fbde980aabf6bc40e7c74b1610 /src
parent4f6a4e59a4e7774fe55ae3ecf37d42faabec07e4 (diff)
efl/docs: clean-up and make it more uniform.
now unified docs are bit more uniform in their start pages, overall improved but much to do :-( SVN revision: 81851
Diffstat (limited to 'src')
-rw-r--r--src/lib/ecore/Ecore.h82
-rw-r--r--src/lib/edbus/EDBus.h71
-rw-r--r--src/lib/eet/Eet.h79
-rw-r--r--src/lib/eina/Eina.h53
-rw-r--r--src/lib/eio/Eio.h51
-rw-r--r--src/lib/embryo/Embryo.h56
-rw-r--r--src/lib/eo/Eo.h53
-rw-r--r--src/lib/escape/Escape.h41
-rw-r--r--src/lib/evas/Evas.h61
-rw-r--r--src/lib/evil/Evil.h57
10 files changed, 399 insertions, 205 deletions
diff --git a/src/lib/ecore/Ecore.h b/src/lib/ecore/Ecore.h
index 448e1aca1f..34210f932e 100644
--- a/src/lib/ecore/Ecore.h
+++ b/src/lib/ecore/Ecore.h
@@ -8,10 +8,14 @@
8 8
9 @page ecore_main Ecore 9 @page ecore_main Ecore
10 10
11 @version 1.7 11 @date 2000 (created)
12 @date 2000-2012
13 12
14 Please see the @ref authors page for contact details. 13 @section toc Table of Contents
14
15 @li @ref ecore_main_intro
16 @li @ref ecore_main_compiling
17 @li @ref ecore_main_next_steps
18 @li @ref ecore_main_intro_example
15 19
16 @section ecore_main_intro Introduction 20 @section ecore_main_intro Introduction
17 21
@@ -36,35 +40,49 @@
36 40
37 For more info on Ecore usage, there are these @ref ecore_examples. 41 For more info on Ecore usage, there are these @ref ecore_examples.
38 42
39 @section ecore_main_compiling How to compile using Ecore? 43 @section ecore_main_compiling How to compile
40 pkgconfig (.pc) files are installed for every ecore module. 44
41 Thus, to compile using any of them, you can use something like the following: 45 Ecore is a library your application links to. The procedure for
42 46 this is very simple. You simply have to compile your application
43@verbatim 47 with the appropriate compiler flags that the @p pkg-config script
44gcc *.c $(pkg-config ecore ecore-$x ecore-$y [...] --cflags --libs) 48 outputs. Note that each module is separate in pkg-config. For
45@endverbatim 49 example using @ref Ecore_Evas_Group:
46 50
47 @section ecore_main_install How is it installed? 51 Compiling C or C++ files into object files:
48 52
49 Suggested configure options for ecore for a Linux desktop X display 53 @verbatim
50 with OpenGL and Software support, communication (networking) and 54 gcc -c -o main.o main.c `pkg-config --cflags ecore ecore-evas`
51 IPC (inter process communication): 55 @endverbatim
52 56
53@verbatim 57 Linking object files into a binary executable:
54./configure \ 58
55 --enable-ecore-con \ 59 @verbatim
56 --enable-ecore-ipc \ 60 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs ecore ecore-evas`
57 --enable-ecore-file \ 61 @endverbatim
58 --enable-ecore-input \ 62
59 --enable-ecore-input-evas \ 63 See @ref pkgconfig
60 --enable-ecore-x \ 64
61 --enable-ecore-evas \ 65 @section ecore_main_next_steps Next Steps
62 --enable-ecore-evas-software-buffer \ 66
63 --enable-ecore-evas-software-x11 \ 67 After you understood what Ecore is and installed it in your system
64 --enable-ecore-evas-opengl-x11 68 you should proceed understanding the programming interface. We'd
65make 69 recommend you to take a while to learn @ref Eina as it is very
66sudo make install 70 convenient and optimized, and Ecore uses it extensively.
67@endverbatim 71
72 Recommended reading:
73
74 @li @ref Ecore_Timer_Group
75 @li @ref Ecore_Idle_Group
76 @li @ref Ecore_FD_Handler_Group
77 @li @ref Ecore_Event_Group
78 @li @ref Ecore_Exe_Group
79
80 @section ecore_main_intro_example Introductory Examples
81
82 @include ecore_timer_example.c
83
84 More examples can be found at @ref ecore_examples.
85
68 86
69 */ 87 */
70 88
diff --git a/src/lib/edbus/EDBus.h b/src/lib/edbus/EDBus.h
index 36cdf2e245..9145c93937 100644
--- a/src/lib/edbus/EDBus.h
+++ b/src/lib/edbus/EDBus.h
@@ -1,14 +1,23 @@
1/** 1/**
2 * @page edbus_main EDBus 2 * @page edbus_main EDBus
3 * 3 *
4 * @section edbus_intro_sec Introduction 4 * @date 2012 (created)
5 *
6 * @section toc Table of Contents
7 *
8 * @li @ref edbus_main_intro
9 * @li @ref edbus_main_compiling
10 * @li @ref edbus_main_next_steps
11 * @li @ref edbus_main_intro_example
12 *
13 * @section edbus_main_intro Introduction
5 * 14 *
6 * EDBus is a wrapper around the 15 * EDBus is a wrapper around the
7 * <a href="http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/dbus">dbus</a> 16 * <a href="http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/dbus">dbus</a>
8 * library, which is a message bus system. It also implements a set of 17 * library, which is a message bus system. It also implements a set of
9 * specifications using dbus as interprocess communication. 18 * specifications using dbus as interprocess communication.
10 * 19 *
11 * @section edbus_modules_sec Modules 20 * @subsection edbus_modules_sec Modules
12 * 21 *
13 * <ul> 22 * <ul>
14 * <li> @ref EDBus_Core 23 * <li> @ref EDBus_Core
@@ -27,50 +36,42 @@
27 * <li> @ref EDBus_Basic 36 * <li> @ref EDBus_Basic
28 * </ul> 37 * </ul>
29 * 38 *
30 * @section edbus_examples_sec Examples 39 * @section edbus_main_compiling How to compile
40 *
41 * EDBus is a library your application links to. The procedure for this is
42 * very simple. You simply have to compile your application with the
43 * appropriate compiler flags that the @c pkg-config script outputs. For
44 * example:
31 * 45 *
32 * Here some EDBus examples: 46 * Compiling C or C++ files into object files:
33 * 47 *
34 * @li @ref banshee.c 48 * @verbatim
35 * @li @ref client.c 49 gcc -c -o main.o main.c `pkg-config --cflags edbus2`
36 * @li @ref complex-types.c 50 @endverbatim
37 * @li @ref complex-types-client-eina-value.c
38 * @li @ref complex-types-server.c
39 * @li @ref connman-list-services.c
40 * @li @ref ofono-dial.c
41 * @li @ref server.c
42 * @li @ref simple-signal-emit.c
43 * 51 *
44 * @example banshee.c 52 * Linking object files into a binary executable:
45 * Access Banshee music player and send commands to it.
46 * 53 *
47 * @example client.c 54 * @verbatim
48 * Client to test various call message types against a provided server 55 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs edbus2`
49 * (@ref server.c) 56 @endverbatim
50 * 57 *
51 * @example complex-types.c 58 * See @ref pkgconfig
52 * Client to test complex types (arrays, structs, dicts) against a
53 * provided server (@ref complex-types-server.c)
54 * 59 *
55 * @example complex-types-client-eina-value.c 60 * @section edbus_main_next_steps Next Steps
56 * Client to test complex types (arrays, structs, dicts) against a
57 * provided server (@ref complex-types-server.c) returning them as
58 * @ref Eina_Value.
59 * 61 *
60 * @example complex-types-server.c 62 * After you understood what EDBus is and installed it in your system
61 * Server to test complex types (arrays, structs, dicts). 63 * you should proceed understanding the programming interface.
62 * 64 *
63 * @example connman-list-services.c 65 * Recommended reading:
64 * Client to list networks/services from connman. 66 * @li @ref EDBus_Core for library init, shutdown and getting a connection.
67 * @li @ref EDBus_Proxy to easily bind a client object to an interface.
68 * @li @ref EDBus_Object_Mapper to monitor server objects and properties.
65 * 69 *
66 * @example ofono-dial.c 70 * @section edbus_main_intro_example Introductory Example
67 * Client to ask oFono to dial.
68 * 71 *
69 * @example server.c 72 * @include ofono-dial.c
70 * Server to reply to @ref client.c requests.
71 * 73 *
72 * @example simple-signal-emit.c 74 * More examples can be found at @ref edbus_examples.
73 * Server that registers a service interface and emits simple signals.
74 */ 75 */
75#ifndef EDBUS_H 76#ifndef EDBUS_H
76#define EDBUS_H 77#define EDBUS_H
diff --git a/src/lib/eet/Eet.h b/src/lib/eet/Eet.h
index 9b2fd1b9a4..693b839056 100644
--- a/src/lib/eet/Eet.h
+++ b/src/lib/eet/Eet.h
@@ -3,23 +3,18 @@
3 3
4 These routines are used for Eet Library interaction 4 These routines are used for Eet Library interaction
5 5
6 @page eet_main Eet Library Documentation 6 @page eet_main Eet
7 7
8 @version 1.7.0 8 @date 2000 (created)
9 @date 2000-2012
10
11 Please see the @ref authors page for contact details.
12 9
13 @section toc Table of Contents 10 @section toc Table of Contents
14 11
15 @li @ref eet_main_intro 12 @li @ref eet_main_intro
16 @li @ref eet_main_example
17 @li @ref eet_main_compiling 13 @li @ref eet_main_compiling
18 @li @ref eet_main_install
19 @li @ref eet_main_next_steps 14 @li @ref eet_main_next_steps
20 @li @ref eet_main_intro_example 15 @li @ref eet_main_intro_example
21 16
22 @section eet_main_intro What is Eet? 17 @section eet_main_intro Introduction
23 18
24 It is a tiny library designed to write an arbitrary set of chunks of data 19 It is a tiny library designed to write an arbitrary set of chunks of data
25 to a file and optionally compress each chunk (very much like a zip file) 20 to a file and optionally compress each chunk (very much like a zip file)
@@ -40,23 +35,7 @@
40 encoded in a platform independent way and can be written and read by any 35 encoded in a platform independent way and can be written and read by any
41 architecture. 36 architecture.
42 37
43 @section eet_main_example A simple example on using Eet 38 @section eet_main_compiling How to compile
44
45 Here is a simple example on how to use Eet to save a series of strings to a
46 file and load them again. The advantage of using Eet over just
47 fprintf() and
48 fscanf() is that not only can these entries be strings, they need no special
49 parsing to handle delimiter characters or escaping, they can be binary data,
50 image data, data structures containing integers, strings, other data
51 structures, linked lists and much more, without the programmer having to
52 worry about parsing, and best of all, Eet is very fast.
53
54 This is just a very simple example that doesn't show all of the capabilities
55 of Eet, but it serves to illustrate its simplicity.
56
57 @include eet-basic.c
58
59 @section eet_main_compiling How to compile using Eet ?
60 39
61 Eet is a library your application links to. The procedure for this is very 40 Eet is a library your application links to. The procedure for this is very
62 simple. You simply have to compile your application with the appropriate 41 simple. You simply have to compile your application with the appropriate
@@ -74,38 +53,14 @@
74 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs eet` 53 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs eet`
75 @endverbatim 54 @endverbatim
76 55
77 You simply have to make sure that pkg-config is in your shell's PATH (see 56 See @ref pkgconfig
78 the manual page for your appropriate shell) and eet.pc in /usr/lib/pkgconfig
79 or its path is in the PKG_CONFIG_PATH environment variable. It's that simple
80 to link and use Eet once you have written your code to use it.
81
82 Since the program is linked to Eet, it is now able to use any advertised
83 API calls to serialize your data.
84
85 You should make sure you add any extra compile and link flags to your
86 compile commands that your application may need as well. The above example
87 is only guaranteed to make Eet add it's own requirements.
88
89
90 @section eet_main_install How is it installed?
91
92 Simple:
93
94 @verbatim
95 ./configure
96 make
97 su -
98 ...
99 make install
100 @endverbatim
101 57
102 @section eet_main_next_steps Next Steps 58 @section eet_main_next_steps Next Steps
103 59
104 After you understood what Eet is and installed it in your system you 60 After you understood what Eet is and installed it in your system
105 should proceed understanding the programming interface. We'd recommend 61 you should proceed understanding the programming interface. We'd
106 you to take a while to learn Eina 62 recommend you to take a while to learn @ref Eina as it is very
107 (http://docs.enlightenment.org/auto/eina/) as it is very convenient 63 convenient and optimized, and Eet provides integration with it.
108 and optimized, and Eet provides integration with it.
109 64
110 Recommended reading: 65 Recommended reading:
111 66
@@ -116,7 +71,21 @@
116 71
117 @section eet_main_intro_example Introductory Examples 72 @section eet_main_intro_example Introductory Examples
118 73
119 @ref eet_examples 74 Here is a simple example on how to use Eet to save a series of strings to a
75 file and load them again. The advantage of using Eet over just
76 fprintf() and
77 fscanf() is that not only can these entries be strings, they need no special
78 parsing to handle delimiter characters or escaping, they can be binary data,
79 image data, data structures containing integers, strings, other data
80 structures, linked lists and much more, without the programmer having to
81 worry about parsing, and best of all, Eet is very fast.
82
83 This is just a very simple example that doesn't show all of the capabilities
84 of Eet, but it serves to illustrate its simplicity.
85
86 @include eet-basic.c
87
88 More examples can be found at @ref eet_examples.
120 89
121 @todo Document data format for images and data structures. 90 @todo Document data format for images and data structures.
122 91
diff --git a/src/lib/eina/Eina.h b/src/lib/eina/Eina.h
index 2205811131..280cc9a7be 100644
--- a/src/lib/eina/Eina.h
+++ b/src/lib/eina/Eina.h
@@ -46,10 +46,16 @@
46/** 46/**
47 * @page eina_main Eina 47 * @page eina_main Eina
48 * 48 *
49 * @version 1.7 49 * @date 2008 (created)
50 * @date 2008-2012
51 * 50 *
52 * @section eina_intro_sec Introduction 51 * @section toc Table of Contents
52 *
53 * @li @ref eina_main_intro
54 * @li @ref eina_main_compiling
55 * @li @ref eina_main_next_steps
56 * @li @ref eina_main_intro_example
57 *
58 * @section eina_main_intro Introduction
53 * 59 *
54 * The Eina library is a library that implements an API for data types 60 * The Eina library is a library that implements an API for data types
55 * in an efficient way. It also provides some useful tools like 61 * in an efficient way. It also provides some useful tools like
@@ -90,8 +96,45 @@
90 * @li @ref Eina_Rectangle_Group rectangle structure and standard manipulation methods. 96 * @li @ref Eina_Rectangle_Group rectangle structure and standard manipulation methods.
91 * @li @ref Eina_Safety_Checks_Group extra checks that will report unexpected conditions and can be disabled at compile time. 97 * @li @ref Eina_Safety_Checks_Group extra checks that will report unexpected conditions and can be disabled at compile time.
92 * @li @ref Eina_String_Group a set of functions that manages C strings. 98 * @li @ref Eina_String_Group a set of functions that manages C strings.
93 * 99 *
94 * Please see the @ref authors page for contact details. 100 * @section eina_main_compiling How to compile
101 *
102 * Eina is a library your application links to. The procedure for this is
103 * very simple. You simply have to compile your application with the
104 * appropriate compiler flags that the @c pkg-config script outputs. For
105 * example:
106 *
107 * Compiling C or C++ files into object files:
108 *
109 * @verbatim
110 gcc -c -o main.o main.c `pkg-config --cflags eina`
111 @endverbatim
112 *
113 * Linking object files into a binary executable:
114 *
115 * @verbatim
116 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs eina`
117 @endverbatim
118 *
119 * See @ref pkgconfig
120 *
121 * @section eina_main_next_steps Next Steps
122 *
123 * After you understood what Eina is and installed it in your system
124 * you should proceed understanding the programming interface.
125 *
126 * Recommended reading:
127 *
128 * @li @ref Eina_Data_Types_Group to find about implemented types and
129 * how to use them.
130 * @li @ref Eina_Tools_Group to find about helper tools provided by eina.
131 *
132 * @section eina_main_intro_example Introductory Example
133 *
134 * @include eina_list_01.c
135 *
136 * More examples can be found at @ref eina_examples.
137 *
95 * 138 *
96 * @defgroup Eina_Data_Types_Group Data Types 139 * @defgroup Eina_Data_Types_Group Data Types
97 * @ingroup Eina 140 * @ingroup Eina
diff --git a/src/lib/eio/Eio.h b/src/lib/eio/Eio.h
index 6e24be8acd..494bc889c6 100644
--- a/src/lib/eio/Eio.h
+++ b/src/lib/eio/Eio.h
@@ -87,7 +87,16 @@ extern "C" {
87/** 87/**
88 * @page eio_main Eio 88 * @page eio_main Eio
89 * 89 *
90 * @section eio_intro_sec Introduction 90 * @date 2012 (created)
91 *
92 * @section toc Table of Contents
93 *
94 * @li @ref eio_main_intro
95 * @li @ref eio_main_compiling
96 * @li @ref eio_main_next_steps
97 * @li @ref eio_main_intro_example
98 *
99 * @section eio_main_intro Introduction
91 * 100 *
92 * The Eio library is a library that implements an API for asynchronous 101 * The Eio library is a library that implements an API for asynchronous
93 * input/output operation. Most operation are done in a separated thread 102 * input/output operation. Most operation are done in a separated thread
@@ -101,9 +110,45 @@ extern "C" {
101 * Linux, BSD, Opensolaris and Windows (XP and CE). It is heavily 110 * Linux, BSD, Opensolaris and Windows (XP and CE). It is heavily
102 * based on @ref Ecore_Main_Loop_Group. 111 * based on @ref Ecore_Main_Loop_Group.
103 * 112 *
104 * @section eio_main_intro_example Introductory Examples 113 * @section eio_main_compiling How to compile
114 *
115 * Eio is a library your application links to. The procedure for this is
116 * very simple. You simply have to compile your application with the
117 * appropriate compiler flags that the @c pkg-config script outputs. For
118 * example:
119 *
120 * Compiling C or C++ files into object files:
121 *
122 * @verbatim
123 gcc -c -o main.o main.c `pkg-config --cflags eio`
124 @endverbatim
125 *
126 * Linking object files into a binary executable:
127 *
128 * @verbatim
129 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs eio`
130 @endverbatim
131 *
132 * See @ref pkgconfig
133 *
134 * @section eio_main_next_steps Next Steps
135 *
136 * After you understood what Eio is and installed it in your system
137 * you should proceed understanding the programming interface.
138 *
139 * Recommended reading:
140 *
141 * @li @ref Eio_Helper for common functions and library initialization.
142 * @li @ref Eio_Map to manipulate files asynchronously (mmap).
143 * @li @ref Eio_Xattr to access file extended attributes (xattr).
144 * @li @ref Eio_Monitor to monitor for file changes (inotify).
145 * @li @ref Eio_Eet to access Eet files asynchronously.
146 *
147 * @section eio_main_intro_example Introductory Example
148 *
149 * @include eio_file_ls.c
105 * 150 *
106 * @ref eio_examples 151 * More examples can be found at @ref eio_examples.
107 * 152 *
108 * @{ 153 * @{
109 */ 154 */
diff --git a/src/lib/embryo/Embryo.h b/src/lib/embryo/Embryo.h
index 1f14e12383..e9020d4ced 100644
--- a/src/lib/embryo/Embryo.h
+++ b/src/lib/embryo/Embryo.h
@@ -3,16 +3,18 @@
3 3
4These routines are used for Embryo. 4These routines are used for Embryo.
5 5
6@page embryo_main Embryo Library Documentation 6@page embryo_main Embryo
7 7
8@image html e_big.png 8@date 2004 (created)
9@note based on Compuphase (http://www.compuphase.com) PAWN language.
9 10
10@version 1.7.0 11@section toc Table of Contents
11@author Carsten Haitzler <raster\@rasterman.com>
12@author Compuphase http://www.compuphase.com
13@date 2004-2012
14 12
15@section intro What is Embryo? 13@li @ref embryo_main_intro
14@li @ref embryo_main_compiling
15@li @ref embryo_main_next_steps
16
17@section embryo_main_intro Introduction
16 18
17Embryo is a tiny library designed to interpret limited Small programs 19Embryo is a tiny library designed to interpret limited Small programs
18compiled by the included compiler, @c embryo_cc. It is mostly a cleaned 20compiled by the included compiler, @c embryo_cc. It is mostly a cleaned
@@ -26,16 +28,40 @@ For more information about the Pawn language, see
26@latexonly http://www.compuphase.com/pawn/pawn.htm @endlatexonly 28@latexonly http://www.compuphase.com/pawn/pawn.htm @endlatexonly
27For the basics about the Small language, see @ref Small_Page. 29For the basics about the Small language, see @ref Small_Page.
28 30
29@section How_to_Use How to Use Embryo? 31@section embryo_main_compiling How to compile
32
33Embryo is a library your application links to. The procedure for this
34is very simple. You simply have to compile your application with the
35appropriate compiler flags that the @p pkg-config script outputs. For
36example:
37
38Compiling C or C++ files into object files:
39
40@verbatim
41gcc -c -o main.o main.c `pkg-config --cflags embryo`
42@endverbatim
43
44Linking object files into a binary executable:
45
46@verbatim
47gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs embryo`
48@endverbatim
49
50See @ref pkgconfig
51
52@section embryo_main_next_steps Next Steps
53
54After you understood what Embryo is and installed it in your system you
55should proceed understanding the programming interface.
56
57Recommended reading:
58
59@li @ref Embryo_Program_Creation_Group to create Embryo from memory or file.
60@li @ref Embryo_Func_Group to expose functions to Embryo.
61@li @ref Embryo_Program_VM_Group to push pop virtual machine.
62@li @ref Embryo_Run_Group to run it.
30 63
31To use Embryo in your code, you need to do at least the following:
32 64
33@li Include @ref Embryo.h.
34@li Load the Embryo program using one of the
35 @ref Embryo_Program_Creation_Group.
36@li Set up the native calls with @ref embryo_program_native_call_add.
37@li Create a virtual machine with @ref embryo_program_vm_push.
38@li Then run the program with @ref embryo_program_run.
39 65
40@todo Clean up compiler code. 66@todo Clean up compiler code.
41@todo Proper overview of the operation of the interpreter, that is how 67@todo Proper overview of the operation of the interpreter, that is how
diff --git a/src/lib/eo/Eo.h b/src/lib/eo/Eo.h
index ffb46fbeac..976328a130 100644
--- a/src/lib/eo/Eo.h
+++ b/src/lib/eo/Eo.h
@@ -64,11 +64,62 @@ enum _Eo_Op_Type
64typedef enum _Eo_Op_Type Eo_Op_Type; 64typedef enum _Eo_Op_Type Eo_Op_Type;
65 65
66/** 66/**
67 * @defgroup Eo Eo Generic Object System 67 * @page eo_main Eo
68 *
69 * @date 2012 (created)
70 *
71 * @section toc Table of Contents
72 *
73 * @li @ref eo_main_intro
74 * @li @ref eo_main_compiling
75 * @li @ref eo_main_next_steps
76 * @li @ref eo_main_intro_example
77 *
78 * @section eo_main_intro Introduction
68 * 79 *
69 * The Eo generic object system. It was designed to be the base object 80 * The Eo generic object system. It was designed to be the base object
70 * system for the EFL. 81 * system for the EFL.
82
83 * @section eo_main_compiling How to compile
84 *
85 * Eo is a library your application links to. The procedure for this is
86 * very simple. You simply have to compile your application with the
87 * appropriate compiler flags that the @c pkg-config script outputs. For
88 * example:
89 *
90 * Compiling C or C++ files into object files:
91 *
92 * @verbatim
93 gcc -c -o main.o main.c `pkg-config --cflags eo`
94 @endverbatim
95 *
96 * Linking object files into a binary executable:
97 *
98 * @verbatim
99 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs eo`
100 @endverbatim
101 *
102 * See @ref pkgconfig
103 *
104 * @section eo_main_next_steps Next Steps
105 *
106 * After you understood what Eo is and installed it in your system
107 * you should proceed understanding the programming interface.
108 *
109 * Recommended reading:
110 *
111 * @li @ref Eo_Class_Base
112 * @li @ref Eo_Class
113 * @li @ref Eo_Events
114 * @li @ref Eo_Composite_Objects
115 *
116 * @section eo_main_intro_example Introductory Example
117 *
118 * @ref Eo_Tutorial
119
120 *
71 * 121 *
122 * @addtogroup Eo
72 * @{ 123 * @{
73 */ 124 */
74 125
diff --git a/src/lib/escape/Escape.h b/src/lib/escape/Escape.h
index c8f6267ec3..210bc872a1 100644
--- a/src/lib/escape/Escape.h
+++ b/src/lib/escape/Escape.h
@@ -20,18 +20,51 @@
20 20
21/** 21/**
22 * @page escape_main Escape 22 * @page escape_main Escape
23 * @date 2011 23 * @date 2011 (created)
24 * 24 *
25 * @section intro_sec Introduction 25 * @section toc Table of Contents
26 *
27 * @li @ref escape_main_intro
28 * @li @ref escape_main_compiling
29 * @li @ref escape_main_next_steps
30 *
31 * @section escape_main_intro Introduction
26 * 32 *
27 * The Escape library is a library that acts implements some of the missing 33 * The Escape library is a library that acts implements some of the missing
28 * function from the PS3 GameOS system that are needed for the proper 34 * function from the PS3 GameOS system that are needed for the proper
29 * functioning of the EFL. 35 * functioning of the EFL.
30 * 36 *
31 * @section escape_sec Escape API Documentation 37 * @section escape_main_compiling How to compile
38 *
39 * Escape is a library your application links to. The procedure for
40 * this is very simple. You simply have to compile your application
41 * with the appropriate compiler flags that the @p pkg-config script
42 * outputs. For example:
43 *
44 * Compiling C or C++ files into object files:
45 *
46 * @verbatim
47 gcc -c -o main.o main.c `pkg-config --cflags escape`
48 @endverbatim
49 *
50 * Linking object files into a binary executable:
51 *
52 * @verbatim
53 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs escape`
54 @endverbatim
55 *
56 * See @ref pkgconfig
57 *
58 * @section escape_main_next_steps Next Steps
59 *
60 * After you understood what Escape is and installed it in your system
61 * you should proceed understanding the programming interface.
32 * 62 *
33 * Take a look at the documentation of @ref mmap/munmap. 63 * Recommended reading:
34 * 64 *
65 * @li @ref Escape_Libgen_Group
66 * @li @ref Escape_Unistd_Group
67 * @li @ref Escape_Mman
35 */ 68 */
36 69
37#include "escape_libgen.h" 70#include "escape_libgen.h"
diff --git a/src/lib/evas/Evas.h b/src/lib/evas/Evas.h
index bf58ec5c2b..2b82d9e8a0 100644
--- a/src/lib/evas/Evas.h
+++ b/src/lib/evas/Evas.h
@@ -1,25 +1,18 @@
1/** 1/**
2 @page evas_main Evas 2 @page evas_main Evas
3 3
4 @version 1.7 4 @date 2000 (created)
5 @date 2000-2012
6
7 Please see the @ref authors page for contact details.
8 @link Evas.h Evas API @endlink
9
10 @link Evas.h Evas API @endlink
11 5
12 @section toc Table of Contents 6 @section toc Table of Contents
13 7
14 @li @ref evas_main_intro 8 @li @ref evas_main_intro
15 @li @ref evas_main_work 9 @li @ref evas_main_work
16 @li @ref evas_main_compiling 10 @li @ref evas_main_compiling
17 @li @ref evas_main_install
18 @li @ref evas_main_next_steps 11 @li @ref evas_main_next_steps
19 @li @ref evas_main_intro_example 12 @li @ref evas_main_intro_example
20 13
21 14
22 @section evas_main_intro What is Evas? 15 @section evas_main_intro Introduction
23 16
24 Evas is a clean display canvas API for several target display systems 17 Evas is a clean display canvas API for several target display systems
25 that can draw anti-aliased text, smooth super and sub-sampled scaled 18 that can draw anti-aliased text, smooth super and sub-sampled scaled
@@ -46,7 +39,7 @@
46 39
47 Evas is not a widget set or widget toolkit, however it is their 40 Evas is not a widget set or widget toolkit, however it is their
48 base. See Elementary (http://docs.enlightenment.org/auto/elementary/) 41 base. See Elementary (http://docs.enlightenment.org/auto/elementary/)
49 for a toolkit based on Evas, Edje, Ecore and other Enlightenment 42 for a toolkit based on Evas, Edje, @ref Ecore and other Enlightenment
50 technologies. 43 technologies.
51 44
52 It is not dependent or aware of main loops, input or output 45 It is not dependent or aware of main loops, input or output
@@ -54,8 +47,8 @@
54 Evas. Similarly, it will not create windows or report windows updates 47 Evas. Similarly, it will not create windows or report windows updates
55 to your system, rather just drawing the pixels and reporting to the 48 to your system, rather just drawing the pixels and reporting to the
56 user the areas that were changed. Of course these operations are quite 49 user the areas that were changed. Of course these operations are quite
57 common and thus they are ready to use in Ecore, particularly in 50 common and thus they are ready to use in @ref Ecore, particularly in
58 Ecore_Evas (http://docs.enlightenment.org/auto/ecore/). 51 @ref Ecore_Evas_Group.
59 52
60 53
61 @section evas_main_work How does Evas work? 54 @section evas_main_work How does Evas work?
@@ -184,7 +177,7 @@
184 scrollbars, sliders, push buttons etc. 177 scrollbars, sliders, push buttons etc.
185 178
186 179
187 @section evas_main_compiling How to compile using Evas ? 180 @section evas_main_compiling How to compile
188 181
189 Evas is a library your application links to. The procedure for this is 182 Evas is a library your application links to. The procedure for this is
190 very simple. You simply have to compile your application with the 183 very simple. You simply have to compile your application with the
@@ -203,42 +196,17 @@
203 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs evas` 196 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs evas`
204 @endverbatim 197 @endverbatim
205 198
206 You simply have to make sure that @c pkg-config is in your shell's @c 199 See @ref pkgconfig
207 PATH (see the manual page for your appropriate shell) and @c evas.pc
208 in @c /usr/lib/pkgconfig or its path in the @c PKG_CONFIG_PATH
209 environment variable. It's that simple to link and use Evas once you
210 have written your code to use it.
211
212 Since the program is linked to Evas, it is now able to use any
213 advertised API calls to display graphics in a canvas managed by it, as
214 well as use the API calls provided to manage data.
215
216 You should make sure you add any extra compile and link flags to your
217 compile commands that your application may need as well. The above
218 example is only guaranteed to make Evas add it's own requirements.
219
220
221 @section evas_main_install How is it installed?
222
223 Simple:
224
225 @verbatim
226 ./configure
227 make
228 su -
229 ...
230 make install
231 @endverbatim
232 200
233 @section evas_main_next_steps Next Steps 201 @section evas_main_next_steps Next Steps
234 202
235 After you understood what Evas is and installed it in your system you 203 After you understood what Evas is and installed it in your system
236 should proceed understanding the programming interface for all 204 you should proceed understanding the programming interface for all
237 objects, then see the specific for the most used elements. We'd 205 objects, then see the specific for the most used elements. We'd
238 recommend you to take a while to learn Ecore 206 recommend you to take a while to learn @ref Ecore, Edje
239 (http://docs.enlightenment.org/auto/ecore/) and Edje 207 (http://docs.enlightenment.org/auto/edje/) and Elementary
240 (http://docs.enlightenment.org/auto/edje/) as they will likely save 208 (http://docs.enlightenment.org/auto/elementary/) as they will
241 you tons of work compared to using just Evas directly. 209 likely save you tons of work compared to using just Evas directly.
242 210
243 Recommended reading: 211 Recommended reading:
244 212
@@ -268,6 +236,9 @@
268 @section evas_main_intro_example Introductory Example 236 @section evas_main_intro_example Introductory Example
269 237
270 @include evas-buffer-simple.c 238 @include evas-buffer-simple.c
239
240 More examples can be found at @ref evas_examples.
241
271 */ 242 */
272 243
273#ifndef _EVAS_H 244#ifndef _EVAS_H
diff --git a/src/lib/evil/Evil.h b/src/lib/evil/Evil.h
index 191aae9c12..0aad5f0613 100644
--- a/src/lib/evil/Evil.h
+++ b/src/lib/evil/Evil.h
@@ -9,10 +9,16 @@
9/** 9/**
10 * @page evil_main Evil 10 * @page evil_main Evil
11 * @author Vincent Torri 11 * @author Vincent Torri
12 * @version 1.7.0 12 * @date 2008 (created)
13 * @date 2008-2012
14 * 13 *
15 * @section intro_sec Introduction 14 * @section toc Table of Contents
15 *
16 * @li @ref evil_main_intro
17 * @li @ref evil_main_ack
18 * @li @ref evil_main_compiling
19 * @li @ref evil_main_next_steps
20 *
21 * @section evil_main_intro Introduction
16 * 22 *
17 * The Evil library is an evil library that ports some evil Unix 23 * The Evil library is an evil library that ports some evil Unix
18 * functions to the Windows (XP or above, or Mobile) platform. The 24 * functions to the Windows (XP or above, or Mobile) platform. The
@@ -28,7 +34,7 @@
28 * cygwin. To compare the size of the DLL themselves, Evil is around 34 * cygwin. To compare the size of the DLL themselves, Evil is around
29 * 33 KB and cygwin DLL is around 800 KB. 35 * 33 KB and cygwin DLL is around 800 KB.
30 * 36 *
31 * @section acknowledgments_sec Acknowledgments 37 * @section evil_main_ack Acknowledgments
32 * 38 *
33 * This library has receive some from people interested in the EFL or 39 * This library has receive some from people interested in the EFL or
34 * not. Among them, evil thanks to Lars Munch, Raoul Hecky, Nicolas 40 * not. Among them, evil thanks to Lars Munch, Raoul Hecky, Nicolas
@@ -36,15 +42,46 @@
36 * Vixie, Daniel Stenberg, who helped the author of the library in 42 * Vixie, Daniel Stenberg, who helped the author of the library in
37 * different fields (code and tests). 43 * different fields (code and tests).
38 * 44 *
39 * @section license_sec license 45 * @section evil_main_compiling How to compile
46 *
47 * Evil is a library your application links to. The procedure for
48 * this is very simple. You simply have to compile your application
49 * with the appropriate compiler flags that the @p pkg-config script
50 * outputs. For example:
51 *
52 * Compiling C or C++ files into object files:
53 *
54 * @verbatim
55 gcc -c -o main.o main.c `pkg-config --cflags evil`
56 @endverbatim
57 *
58 * Linking object files into a binary executable:
59 *
60 * @verbatim
61 gcc -o my_application main.o `pkg-config --libs evil`
62 @endverbatim
63 *
64 * See @ref pkgconfig
65 *
66 * @section evil_main_next_steps Next Steps
40 * 67 *
41 * The Evil library is distributes under a modified BSD license. See 68 * After you understood what Evil is and installed it in your system
42 * the files COPYING and COPYING-PLAIN in the top level directory for 69 * you should proceed understanding the programming interface.
43 * the full license text.
44 * 70 *
45 * @section reference_sec Reference API 71 * Recommended reading:
46 * 72 *
47 * Use the horizontal menu above to navigate into the reference API 73 * @li @ref Evil_Mman
74 * @li @ref Evil_Libgen_Group
75 * @li @ref Evil_Unistd_Group
76 * @li @ref Evil_Dlfcn
77 * @li @ref Evil_Pwd_Group
78 * @li @ref Evil_Stdio_Group
79 * @li @ref Evil_Main_Group
80 * @li @ref Evil_Inet_Group
81 * @li @ref Evil_Dirent_Group
82 * @li @ref Evil_String_Group
83 * @li @ref Evil_Stdlib_Group
84 * @li @ref Evil_Time_Group
48 */ 85 */
49 86
50/** 87/**